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Full text of "Sub turri = Under the tower : the yearbook of Boston College"

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EDITORIAL STAFF CHIEFS 
DANIEL J. HARKINS JOHN F. MCCARTHY WILLIAM E. DALEY 

Editor-in-Chief Art Editor Business Manager 



It is no ordinary year in whicli the Class of Nineteen- 
Eighteen leaves Boston College. Other classes have left Alma 
Mater at times when great crises have confronted the world, 
but none have ever received their degrees under circumstances 
like those attendant upon our graduation. It is not for us 
to dwell upon the greatness of the issues involved in this 
stu]iendous world conflict or ujion the magnitude of the task 
lying before us ; we doubt if any voice or pen can ever 
adequately express them. It is not for us to tell of these world 
conditions, but rather of their effect upon our class. 

We have seen of the one hundred and five men who fin- 
ished junior but seventy-six able to graduate. We have seen 
Boston College ranks dejdeted. We have seen three Boston 
College men, one our classmate, die in the serA^ce of tlieir 
country, men whose glorious deaths must ever serve as inspir- 
ations to Boston College men to come. For them Ave need only 
say these words in praise : "Dulcc et deconim est pro patria 
morV 

From these three heroes only was the supreme sacrifice 
demanded: yet Alma Mater's sons have done their share. 
Not the least of all their sacrifices has been that made by our 
fellow classmates Avho Avere unable to obtain their degrees 
AAdth us. To these — the men of our class AA^ho Avere the first to 
go, and who by reason of their going were deprived of the joy 
of reaching the much-coveted goal for AA^hich they had striven 
so long and so successfully — to these the Class of Nineteen- 
Eighteen dedicates this, its book, \Adth love, affection and pride. 



®n titpap Mtn in ^emicp ftops tljr QJlaaH nf 5?inptppn-€tgliteen 
ipdirate tliia lank 



A K M Y 



FRANCIS K. QUINN 



Harold J. Axdeusox 
Kaymoxd T. Cahill 
Warren J. Clear 
Charles L. Cote 
William F. Donnelly 
Charles S. Fitzgerald 
Francis J. (Gallagher 
Theodore S. Gillespie 
Edward L. Kickham 
Daniel J. Leary 
Wilfred C. MacDonald 



Anthony J. Maguire 
Michael J. Maher 
William F. Maloney 
Francis M. Xolan 
Thomas A. Phelan 
John J. Roman 
Paul N. Kooney 
John Ryan 
Philip D. Shea 
Francis J. Whelan 
Arthur A. Wholley 



NAVY 



Francis N. Flaherty 
Thomas S. Hurley 
John C. Manley 



John V. Murray 
Daniel F. O'Connor 
John M. O'Loughlin 



iFranrtH IK. (fmnn 



Tlie Class of Xineteen-Eighteeii keenly feels the loss of its 
first member to die in tlie service of tlie conntry ; Francis K. 
Quinn was the first Boston College man to die in the service. 
He was a member of our class from the tirst days of freshman 
to the opening days of senior. At that time he joined the 
colors and was attached to the l()7th Aero Squadron as a 
mechanic ; his ability Avas soon recognized, for he had already 
begun to study for a commission and had been ordered to 
complete his stiulies in France. While aboard the transport 
that was to carry him overseas he was stricken with pneu- 
monia and was removed to the base hospital of the air service 
at ^Mineola, Long Island. Before many hours his soul, for- 
tified by the last rites of the Church, fled from this world to 
meet its Maker. 

Xo words can express the deep respect that he com- 
manded of us from our very first meeting with him ; no words 
can express the high esteem with which we learned to regard 
him ; no words can ever begin to ex])ress the great love which 
Ave bore him (hiring our college days together and which we 
shall never cease to bear towards his sacred memory. Any 
attemi^t at eulogy were inadequate ; his .sui)reme sacrifice is 
an everlasting tribute to his memory and must stamp him as 
the truest type of Catholic knighthood. 

"Greater lore liath no man than this, that a man lay 
down his life for his friends-' 



* 



An Ap^jrrrtattnn 



We, the Class of Xineteeii-Eigliteen, wish to make public 
expression of our ai)i)reciatioii of all that has been done for 
Tis (luring our four years association with the faculty of 
Alma Mater. Other classes have realized their obligations 
to the faculty and have expressed their appreciation in their 
annual i)ubllcations ; we, realizing just as keenly as any other 
class under what dee]) obligation to our professors we shall 
always be, and realizing that we have no gift of eloquence 
great enough to find adequate expression for that obligation, 
hesitate in the attemjit to express our admiration and resjject 
for our beloved faculty. 

Ours shall be no studied phrases : rather shall they be 
expressions that come from the heart. The devotion and care 
manifested for our every action, the wise guidance and tender 
solicitude exercised at all times for our spiritual and intel- 
lectual benefit and the ever present example of men Avhose 
lives have been consecrated to the service of God — all these 
will ever serve as sources of strength in the days to come. 
Here and now does every member of the Class of Nineteen- 
Eighteen make public testimony of his deep admiration, sin- 
cere respect and lasting gratitude to the Jesuit Fathers of 
Boston College. 




KE^'. CHAKLEW W. lA'OXS, S.-I. 




KEV. MICHAEL JESSUP. S.J. 

I'refect of Studies 




WILLIAM ^' 

Prefect ( 



C'OHLlSvS, S..I. 
f I )iscliiliiie 




Kl':\'. .lOXIOiS 1. .1. COKKKiAX, S..1. 

I'ruffssor to Seuiur uf Ktliics miuI .Iiirisiini(U'iic( 




RVA'. -JOHN P. MEACmEK. S.J. 
I'rufessor to Senior of I'.syeliology and Natural Theology 




KKX. WILLIAM DEVLIX, S.-L 

I'rofesstir to .Senior of I'edagogy 




REV. MICHAEL J. AHEKX, S.J. 
Professor to Seuior of Chemistry, Astrouomy aucl Geolog.\- 




KK^'. .JAMES T. McCOKMlCK, .S.-l. 

I'nifessoi' to Senior of Evideuces of Christian rteligiou 




WILLIAM G. LOGUE, S..1 . 
Professor to Senior of Physics 




KKV. JOHN S. KEATING, S..I. 

Fiiculty Adviser tii Srn Trmu Stuff 




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®Jf^ f par Innk 

ONE YEAR TO COLLECT THE MONEY 

ONE YEAR TO OET THE BOOK OUT 

ONE YEAR BEHIND IN TIME 

BUT 

ONE YEAR SOONER THAN SOME EXPECTED 



1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



HAROLD J. ANDERSON 

Soiiierville 

'•('dim- out to Soiiicrrillc if i/oii iraiit to .s-rc 
soiiictliiiiy nice" 

Dance ("oinmittee (4) ; Sodality (1.2.:!): ("lass 
FootbaH (1. IM. 

Ilarold comes from the city of big 
tliiiisis, and lias move than once im- 
l)ressed that fact upon our minds. His 
favorite saying is : "Oh, boys, you ought 
to see them out in Somerville!" How- 
ever, we did not have to be told by Har- 
old about these things. There is no gain- 
saying the fact that Harold was a social 
"lion," but ujion that did not rest his only claim to popularity. He 
was an athlete of some note, being a strong candidate for varsity 
honors until an injury to his legs put him out of the running. 

Up to the time when he joined Democracy's army in December, 
Harold J. proved himself to be a staunch supporter of everything 
B. C. He was a worker who was ever ready to devote his time and 
energy for any task that would help either his friends, his class 
or his college. His was a cheery dis- 
position, and his was a smile that 
never would come off. Ou that mem- 
orable trij) to West Point he was one 
of the chief entertainers. Of him we 
will always have pleasant remem- 
brances. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



EOLAND S. BATEMAN 

Audovei' 
"Herc'fi an imitation of — " 

SotlalUy (■_'. ?,) : (ilee riuli (1, J. :!. 4). 

Roland was 1918's biggest "heart- 
breaker"; at Xotre Dame he made a 
decided imijression. 'Tis said that lie 
didn't watch his step. At any rate, he 
fell hard ; we don't know what was the 
canse of his fall. Eoland was the class's 
sartorial artist, bnt there were other 
reasons for his fame. His Avit Avas 
ready and his skill in mimicry Ayas un- 
equalled by any. His imitations of lien- 
tenants and autocrats Avere heartily ai)i)lauded by the class. His 
IMinctuality and faithful attendance Ayere outstanding features of 
his career at the Heights. These Ayere probably the chief reasons 
for the great confidence aiul deep respect that his professors had 
in him. 

Thus you see the class's estimate of one of its 
biggest members; the Ayorld at large Ayill find that 
Aye are not far from right in this estimate, for he 
surely Ayill rise fai- aboye the leyel of the ordi- 
nary man. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JOSEPH H. BENAED 

Lawrence 

''Joe" 

"3ey, Cunney" 

Class Baseliall (1, 2) : Class Football (1. 2) ; 
Sodality (1, 2. 3, 4). 

Many membei'.s of the class liave 
felt the iudispxitable evidence of Joe's 
presence during class hours, for he was 
ahvays exchanging courtesies with vari- 
ous members of the class, notably Pat 
O'Malley and the Salem spendthrift. 
Joe did not believe in getting some- 
thing for nothing; ask Pat. Pat was 
ahvays trying to give Joe something, 

and when Joe did receive the gifts he always managed to give 

back at least their equivalent. As treasurer of the Lawrence 

B, C. Club Joe was a leading spirit in its affairs; in every social 

affair of the club he was a prominent figure and contributed 

largely to the enjoyment. 

'Tis whispered that Joe will pursue his studies at a school 

not far from his old Alma Mater, at an 

institution known in the past as our 

Annex. Rumor is a fickle thing, so that 

one cannot place too much credence in 

the above mentioned possibility. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



RAYMOND J. ERUNIXG 

Koxbury 

''Dutch" 

Oi-cliesti-M fl, 2. 3) ; .Science (o) : Itadin f'luli (4). 

Modesty seems to have been one of 
the strongest traits of the Bruiiiug fam- 
ily, and "Ray" certainly possessed that 
attribute. There was, however, one 
occasion when "Dutch" "opened up," so 
to speak ; everybody remembers the out- 
ing and how amiably "Dutch" then 
acted the part of host. But that was 
about the only time during "Ray's" car- 
eer when he basked in the limelight. 

"Dutch" belonged to the "jioisoned gas brigade," and acted as 
the mascot for the ^Molecules in their games with the Lawyers and 
the Pedagogists. However, when he gets to Siberia with the 
U. kS. X. R. F. he will have to display a choicer brand of wares, for 
the Chemists always met with disaster. 

Popularly known among his classmates as the "Irish Ambas- 
sador," "Ray" showed a rare knack of making friends, a faculty 
■^ which will surely aid him in his sure 

road to success. 





27 



1918 



SUB TU R R I 



1918 



EAYMOND T. CAHILL 

•Jamaica Plain 

''Sticks" 

"Big time tonight, hogs" 

\'arsity Track JIanager (4) ; Varsity Hockey (4) ; 
<;iee Chill (3, 4) : Students- Athletic Council (4>. 

"Sticks" has many reasons for liis 
fame, but not the least of these is his 
dramatic work ; his salute to Pilate will 
always be mentioned when the Passion 
Play is brought nj) in conversation. It 
was effective and appreciated by both 
cast and andience. He was the object 
of much attention in the cast in the 
seventh scene. His athletic prowess 
brought him even greater fame ; as a wing upon our first varsity 
hockey team his playing was most creditable. As varsity track 
manager his faithfulness e(pmlled his tact and judgment; his 
keen interest in Boston College was manifested by his almost 
daily attendance at the Athletic Office immediately after 1.15. 

As for "Stick's" social life, the class can readily vouch for the 
fact that when the Glee Club called for members for its public 
appearances he was not found wanting. Invariably after the 
singing he was more prominent than 
any other member of the club. Plence 
the reader can readily understand why 
we say that "Sticks" was one of our 
most popular classmates. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




JOHX A. CAXAVAX 

East Boston 

"Sec here, jcUou-k' 
Jliiriiuette Debating Society (1. :.') ; Sodality il. '1. 
3, 4) : Pulton Deliating Society (3. 4) ; Alternate. 
Fulton I'rize Debate (3) ; Class President (4) : 
Executive Connnittee (4): liing Com- 
mittee (4) : Fulton Lecture Team 
(4) : Cluiirnian, Intercollegiate 
Debating Committee (4). 

If you were present on graduation 
day, you doubtless heard the Dean re- 
peat these words : "The gold medal is 
aAvarded to John A. Canavan." In no 
more fitting way can Ave introduce to 
you the president of our class. John has been the class "shark" 
from our all too distant freshman days, for every year he has been 
the medal winnei*. His rei)utation has been made mostly in this, 
but he will be remembered almost as well for the keen interest he 
displayed in certain college activities. He has been one of our 
leading debaters, figuring in Fulton Prize Debates and Oratorical 
Contests, in which he always gave a fine account of himself. To 
no better man could the class have bestowed its highest gift. As 
oui" senior class president John conquered 
many trying difficulties, for he was very 
liopular with both faculty and student 
body. With the same confidence that the 
class has ever manifested in his ability 
and sincerity, it now predicts for him suc- 
cess in whatever "walk'" of life he may 
choose. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



WILLIAM J. CAEEY 

South Bo>stou 
''Will" 

.MMi-ciuette Debating Society (1, 2) ; Fultou Debating 

Society (o. 4) ; Varsity Tennis Manager 

(4) : Sodality (2, 3. i) . 

Meiitiou the name of South Boston 
Boston College Club and yon instinc- 
tively think of Bill. Together with 
31arty Kane he was the power that was 
i-espoiisihle for the great social success 
of that organization. Yes, Bill is quite 
a social "lion"; he has many friends; 
those Avhom we have met, Bill, were 
very charming. Bill always had shown 
good judgment. 

Since he entered freshman Bill has shown himself in class a 
(iniet, serious, and a more or less retiring individual. This you 
can see at a glance is aside from his social activity. Bill gave 
us the greatest of all his social demonstrations when he "pulled 
off" the l)ig "scoo})"' of the Senior Soiree ; nothing went wrong at 
our Soiree, a sure tribute to Bill's genius. 

South Boston will never be "off the social map" 
as long as it numbers fellows like Bill among its 
inhabitants. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




WILLIAM M. CA«HIX 

Ciuubriilge 
"Wliut's next, Daley f" 

Class Foutlinll (1, 2) : ('1,-iss Ib.ckry (n, 4| : Class Foot- 
ball (3) : \'arsit.v F.M.Miall ( H : \arsU.v Il..eke.v 
U): Fiiltoii Dciintiii^' Soi-icty |4|; Kailio 
Club, President (4) : Sodality (1. L', :;. 4 I. 

Behold the originator of tlie col- 
lege's greatest war activity, the Radio 
Club. Bill was the i>ioiieer in whose 
fertile intellect was born the idea of 
establishing here at Boston College a 
club whose province would be to imi)art 
to students a fundamental knowledge of 
wireless, theory and practice. Having 
himself acquii-ed a thorough knowledge 
of the subject he was to teach, said knowledge having been the 
result of a course of instruction at a government radio school. 
"Cash" was well able to hold forth among the "Dots and Dashes." 
So great has been his success with his newly formed and most 
timely club that we feel sure that his efforts are the beginning only 
of what promises to be one of the great institutions of the college. 
Rumor has it that Bill is quite as startling a success in the 
social field as he was in the scientific. Rumor 
is an unstal)le quality in which too much cre- 
dence should not be jilaced; however, there are 
many of Bill's classmates who are willing 
to vouch for him as a social "lion." So there 
you are. 

We who know Bill will vouch for his suc- 
cess in an}^ and every line of endeavor ; blessed 
with a fine simny disposition and a plentiful 
suj^ply of gray matter, he is certain to make a 
mark for himself in his chosen profession. 

31 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



waltp:r h. caverly 

Souierville 

"Doc" 

"Tlir iipiidiion inix a success'' 
Scifiice ('lull (M, 41 ; Sinlallty (2. 3). 

"Doc" won his spurs as a surgeon 
A^ ^ _^^ when his tii-st successful operation took 

^^^^ 1 place in the biology class. It was he 

^I^^^L ^^pl^^^ who wielded the knife upon that notable 
^^^^^^ VUjS^^ occasion, but we A^enture to say that in 
i^^^^^^^^^^^^ spite of his success upon that occasion 
^^^^^^^^^^H^^K tew of the class call for 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ' "Doc's" services for a like ailment, 
llowevei-, those in the "know" realize that this foreword is in no 
way intended as a "knock." On the contrary, from the beginning 
of our laboratory days Walter has been the class's leading chemist 
and biologist ; he successfully completed a course — that he laid 
out for hinvself — that would have killed three ordinary men. AVal- 
ter all but lived in the laboratory. Chemistry is no joke, and the 
class greatly admired Walter H. Caverly for his untiring applica- 



tion to the task he set before himself, 
him that he Avas a "friend to all who 
needed a friend." His sincerity, his 
application and his reliability were his 
foremost qualities; since we have 
known him for a gentleman in the true 
sense of the word, and a most likable 
fellow, what can prevent his achieving 
the success he desires? 



Trulv could it be said of 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



ANdUS J. CHISHOLM 

Arliii»toii 

"Gr«-S" 

'Aiiiflliiii;/ (li)iiif/ (il Ihc Frinniji ?" 



FiiltcJii (41 : It.-Kliii dull (4) ; ('l:i 
Sodality (4i. 



IlnrUcy (41 




Aiigiis rectified what would have 
been the mistake of a lifetime when, re- 
voking his earlier decision to make 
Holy Cross his Alma Mater, he decided 
to come to Boston College. In the one 
short year that he has been with us this 
citizen of Arlington has made good. 
Behold an usher ! His favorite activity 
was gracing all possible occasions at a 
certain institution in the Fenway. ( He 

didn't have to go to Worcester to learn that. ) But athletics also 
claimed a share of his time, for he certainly i>layed one corking 
game at goal-tend for the senior hockey team. The (>i)posing for- 
wards had much cause to regret that it Avas Angus who was guard- 
ing the net. Yevx few goals slipped past him. Our hockey laurels 
are due in no small way to Angus. In both the Radio Club and 
Fulton Debating Society he was found to be "on the job." We 
would like to wager that he is very much 
on the jol) now, for he is engaged in chas- 
ing the Hun in France. We feel sure that 
he will do the same good job that has char- 
acterized his one vear at the Heights. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




WAREEX J. CLEAR 

Newton 

"Thr iiiilii ix drad" 

Maiuuette (1. 21 : I'resulent Jlaiquette [2) : Marquette 
Prize Delate (2. 3); Wiuiier (3): Fulton (3); 
Intercollegiate Debating Team (3) : Orator- 
ical Contest (1. -J. 3) ; AVinner (3) : Stylns 
(1.2, 3) : Passion Play (2. 3). 

Ja.sijer certainly was one of the 
big- men of tlie class, pliysically and 
mentally. We now apologize for tlie 
limited space whicli we now give him. 
The activities mentioned at the top of 
the page show what kind of a fellow he 
was, at least as far as his talents and energy are concerned. As 
for his disposition, we can offer nothing Imt praise; he was ami- 
able, friendly to all, thoroughly imbued with that college spirit 
which we adore in anyone and which made him one of the most 
prominent men in the college. He had two expressions that will 
go down in history as famous : "I can put out the Year Book for 
nothing," and "The man is dead." 

Commissioned at the vSecond Plattsburg 
Camp, Jasper and Ed Kickham were the class's 
first army lieutenants. Judging from his col- 
lege record, the class feels sure that the past 
year would have brought him many new and 
greater honors. Already honored in a degree 
far greater than that to which the class could 
raise him, Warren J. Avill make a name for him- 
self wherever fortune will lead him. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



JOHN J. COCHRAN 

Milfoi-d 

S<i(liilit.v (1. U, :;. 41 : Class Kasehall (1 l : Fiiltdii Cti : 
Science Chili (4). 

•Toe is one of the class's two rep- 
resentatives from the town of Milford. 
Even that can be forgiven. But the ben- 
efit of such a long journey to and from 
school is shown by the fact that Joe's 
home lessons were always ready. Some- 
times some members of the class have 
reason to regret their living so near 
to school. Joe ought to l)Oom Milford's 
real estate among those fellows. They 
say that "early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, 
wealthy and Avise." Half these conditions are fulfilled in Joe's 
case — we are not so sure about the other half — for Joe is on 
his way to the college long ere sun-up. 

He is one of the fellows who form the backbone of the class; 
quiet, studious, never distracted by the less serious side of life, 

'T»\ost T '^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^ those men Avhom everyone 

admires. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




THOMAS M. COLLINS 

Wakefield 

•'77/c T'icffl/" of WakefiehV 

-Blue Book!" 

il;n-(|uette Debuting Society (li) : Fulton lo. 4) : 
Secretary Fulton (4) ; Science Club (4). 

Hei'e we introduce to the reader the 
class's best little speecli-maker. His 
sijeecli accepting the responsibilities of 
the office of Secretary of the Fulton De- 
bating- Society, his eulogy of Abraham 
Lincoln, his ever dignified appeals to 
the chair during our somewhat strenu- 
ous class meetings in Avhich he began 
with a solemn "Mr. Chairman," his elo- 
qxient plea for the rights of the down- 
trodden i>roletariat, and most of all that never-to-be-forgotten 
address beginning and ending with the commanding Avord "Blue- 
book" have earned for him a niche in Boston College's Hall of 
Fame. His kindly spirit Avas especially manifested by his benev- 
olent attempts to aid our class secretary Jim Kooney in the 
jjerformance of his duties. More than once did he offer advice and 
motions for ai)i)ropriations for Jim, for Avhich he receiA^ed due 
credit. 

Dignified, serious-minded, enjoying the best 
Avishes of the class in AA^hateA^er he undertook, a 
tireless Avorker imbued Avith nothing but the best 
of motiA^es, he Avas a unique figure in our class. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




MYLBS E. CONNOLLY 

Roxbiiry 

"77(6 Edifor' 

"FcJlotrn, irc iraiit to shoir more splrii" 

Jlaniuette Debating Society (1, 2) ; Fulton (3, 4) : 

.S7///m,s Board (3, 4) ; St.i/his. Kditor-in-Chief (4) : 

Xewnian Academy (3, 4) ; Sodality 1. 2. 

3. 4): Fulton I'l-ize Deliate (4); 

('oiiiiiieiiceinent Speakei- (4). 

Myles took jjerhaps a greater inter- 
est ill class affairs than any other mem- 
ber of the ch^ss, and never hesitated to 
voice his views if lie thought they would 
benelit the class in any way. That is 
why we pronounce him a lively, corking 
good chap, a doer-of -things. To him be- 
longs much credit for the masterly way he stepped in and handled 
77/ r ^fijlii.s in the face of the unusual difficulties of the past year. 
From the literary and tinaucial standpoints 77(c Stijlui^ was never 
better ; we account for this success by the fact that ]Myles was the 
"boss." He has been especially i)roininent in public speaking this 
past year, putting up a glorious tight for the Fulton Medal and 
being Salutatorian of the Class of 1918. Myles' chief joy in life 
was to run down the few "knockers" and 
point out to them the error of their ways 
His chief ambition is to see established a 
central Boston College Club of Boston where 
the boys might congregate in the years to 
come. 

Myles had the real college spirit ; loyalty 
was his watchword. We know that future 
events will prove that Myles lived up to all 
we expected of him in loj^^alty to his ideals, 
devotion to the task before him, that he will 
alwavs bring honor to Alma Mater. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




JOHX W. CORCORAN 

Doi'che.ster 
"The Ad-(/cffcr" 

■•\Vh,rr\s -Bah,''" 

Chiss HmsHimII ll. 2) ; Class K:isketl)all (1. L! » : Class 

Ildikey C!. 4): Class Fiiotlall ll. 4); Sui! 

Tiuiti (4) : Sodality (1. 2. :>. 4) : Seieucp 

Chill (41 ; Fnltoii Dfluitin;; Sucicty (4). 

John ]iever troubled himself much 
Avith takiug trijis to the FeiiAvay; 
liostou Uuiversitv was a place rather 
dear to his affections. We have met 
some very uice friends of John's Avho 
AA'ent there. He was one of the repre- 
sentatives from the Meeting House Hill section of Dorchester, and 
he did much to put it on the map. If he was mixed up in anything 
one was sure to find his side partner, "Babe" Ramisch, in on the 
deal. The Editors of the Book Avish to giA^e special praise to John 
for the substantial aid he gave this volume. A great career awaits 
him in the advertising game. 

John could be serious when the occasion demanded; his marks 
testify to the seriousness Avith which he regarded his studies. We 
noAv testify to the esteem Avith Avhich he Avas 
regarded by his felloAv classmates and the 
confidence AA'hich his professors and his fel- 
low members of 1918 feel in his success. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



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CHAKLES L. COTE 

Cambridge 

"Charlie" 

X'arsity Haseliall (2. 3) ; (ilee C'liili (1. 2. :>t : 
Dance ('Dinniittee (4) . 

Charlie was among those sous of 
Boston College who early in the year 
manifested their lovaltr to their coun- 
try, true to the principles of patriotism 
that three years at B. C. had instilled. 
His natural love of adventure and nov- 
elty and his and)itious nature promjited 
him to become an army aviator. At the 
ground school, he applied himself dili- 
gently to his tasks and brought honor to 
his Alma Mater and distinction to himself by completing his 
course among the first Ave in a class of ninety cadets. He has 
since won his wings at the flying school. 

But we must say a few words about Charlie as we knew him 
at college. In the baseball firmament he shone as a star of the 
first magnitude; what B. C. rooter does not remember the day 
when Charlie knocked the cover off the ball, defeating Harvard 
and, incidentally, Eddie Mahan? 

We also remember him as one who was 
conspicuous in class by his absence. His 
intermittent presence was truly estimated 
and reAvarded by Fr. McCluskey when the 
latter "dubbed" Charlie "Come day, go 
dav. Cote." 




30 



1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




FRANCIS J. COTTER 

Frauiinghani 

"'Frank" 

"As vice-president, I icill do iitij hest" 
Vlce-I'reslcTeut Class (4) ; Sodality (1, :!, o. 4). 

Yoli are now face to face with our 
war vice-president ; well did lie carry 
out the duties of his office. Like our 
friend from Milford, Frank is another 
ad for liA'ing in a rural district. Living- 
half way between the Hub of the Uni- 
verse and the Heart of the Common- 
wealth, Frank was likewise half way 
between Boston College and Holy 
Cross ; but he chose the wiser course in 
regard to his future studies, and hence 
his face adoi-iis this jjage. Frank never went to the Fenway ; that 
was one of the hard features of living where he did. 

He was not one of those fellows who thrust themselves upon 
the notice of others, yet the class regarded him as a man who 
Avas thoroughly deiiendable. It proved this by putting upon 
Frank's shoulders the heavy burden that the vice-presidency en- 
tailed. We feel sure that he will gain the conlidence 
of others as he gained 1918's. And what more could 
we sav of anv fellow? 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JOHN P. CREED 

Haverliill 

"Jack" 

"Well, I don't kiioir about that:'' 

.Maniuette DeliatiiiK Society (2): Science Club (4) : 

Sfii Tt-uiu (4): Itadio Cluli (4): Class I'.aseliall 

(1): Class Kasketliall CI); Sudality (2. 4t. 

Joliii was one of the first of tbe class 
to become acquainted with the beauties 
of the Fenway ; for when the fellows 
began to present themselves in greater 
numl)ers it was John who did the honors 
and it was John who knew everyone. 
But as to whether or not he followed up 
his first successes, that's another ques- 
tion. John was one of those good looking, blonde haired fellows 
who came, who saw, and were conquered. His obliging disjjosition 
and his evident readiness to do a favor won him many friends at 
the Fenway and at University Heights. 

Coming from the famous and quiet city of Haverhill, John was 
(]uiet also and became famous also, but for far different reasons 
than those that made his city famous. Much of his fame was due 
to the medical assistance which he rendered to "Doc" Caverly in 
the most famous of all operations. We understand 
that medicine will be John's line, and from what it 
knows of his character, the class sincerely ho]3es 
and feels that success will be his. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JAMES H. CROWDLE 

Newton 

''■Jimmy" 

'•Come on, Jake" 

.Mnnuiette lM;;itinK Society (1. 2) -.Fulton (4) ; Class 

FiMitliall (II : Class Baseball (1); Science 

Chib (4) ; Sodality (1. 2, 3. 4). 

Tliis jiage is devoted to the doings of 
the sage of Xewton. As far back as our 
freshman days James impressed ns 
forcibly with his appearance; even in 
those days his scholarly bearing earned 
for him the title of "Sage of Xewton." 
Earning all his honors by his own un- 
aided efforts, burning the midnight 
oil in his jiursuit of knowledge, Jim 

developed a remarkable facility in translating Greek and Latin 

texts. He added many a medal and premium to his already large 

collection, through his entire college course. 

We would not be surprised if Jim offered his services to the 

government in a chemical capacity, as that ought to be his ])ro- 

fession, judging from his record at college in the sciences. 

Jim certainly showed of what stuff Newton men were made. 

His serious and interested attitude towards 

class affairs, his evident willingness to do all 

in his power for the class, made him one of our 

best liked fellows. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



FEAXCIS C. CKOWLEY 

Dorcliester 
"Frank" 



\';irsit.v TiaeU (1. 



Cl.-is 



ClMss Hasi 
Tracl; CJi 



liall 111; C-nitaiii 




Frank was one of onr Dorchester 
constituents. An all-around fellow, so 
to speak, lie took an interest in liis 
studies that was equalled only by his 
interest in college activities. "While 
Fi'ank's name will not go down in inter- 
collegiate circles as that of a "world- 
beater," yet the followers of track and 
especially the men of 1918 Avill remem- 
ber some of his thrilling finishes in races on our cinder path. The 
race which the writer i)articularly has in mind is the one which 
took place in our junior year when he forced tlie college's best 
runnel' to break the college's half-mile record. 

Fi-ank's record for punctual and constant attendance was one 
which will not l)e easily equalled ; nay, we dare say that the faculty 
doubts as to anyone's ability to equal it. The class doubts, at 

any rate. The class extends to him 
its heartiest wishes for the fiiture. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




RICHAED J. CROWLEY 

>»orth Abington 

"Dick" 

■•Did fill see Forrester or Hheeraii ?" 

.M;\riniftte I leliatiiif,' Society (2) : Fulton (4) : Science 

Cluli (4): Itndid Cliili (4); Sun TtTRni (4); 

Daiifc ('(iiiiiuittee (4) : Scidnlity (1. 2. 

.'1, 4 ) ; I'MssidU I'lay (i'. :;) . 

To Dick we iiiiselflshly give belated 
credit for his share in that episode of 
the i)iano ; he was present on that mem- 
orable occasion, bnt in his own modest 
way managed to escape notice. That 
was not the only time when Dick was 
present when a good time was being 
offei-ed, foi- he belonged to the Ushei-s' Clnb. Dick Avas another 
of those up and doing fellows, and as a result of his acting in the 
Passion Play he attracted much favorable comment. We all 
I'emember that famous misinterpretation of a famous line uttered 
in a despondent voice : "Brother, there is no soap in thine eyes." 
Dick belonged to another famous organization, the Campers' 
Club. He received the same royal welcome which was accorded to 
his brother members. 

As a gentleman Dick had no superior; we say 
the same for his friendship. But what impressed us 
most of all was the fact that whatever task was 
assigned to him, whether it be studies, in class activ- 
ities or in literary work, Dick did it with a cheer- 
fulness and a thoroughness that augur well for his 
future. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



THOMAS J. CUXXEY 

Salem 

-J'lciixc (Idii'l flisfiirh iiic" 
Clnss P.aseliall ll ) ; Sodality |1. 2). 

Tom was a phigger in everv sense 
of the word, as practically every mem- 
ber of the class can readily testify. 
He was on our ever ready receijtion 
committee and did yeoman work, believ- 
ing that it was more blessed to give 
than to receive. He Avas always the 
object of marked attention. Tom was 
one of the class's greatest idiilanthro- 
pists; he was generous to a fault, giving freely of what he had to 
give. Many a class actiA'ity received an added stimnhis as a resnlt 
of his efforts for its success. 

The wilds of Salem gave us Tom; we now send him back, a 
finished product of culture. 

Quiet, nay, bashful, always unassuming, gentlemanly to a 
fault, courteous to the greatest degree, beloved 
^~m l>y both classmates and professors, Tom will 

nuike a big mark in the world. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



DAVID F. DALER 

]->rockl()ii 

"Dave" 

"GrI the Ycur Book out at inii/ cost'' 
Class HMscliall (1, J) : ^Sodiility (1. li. ;'.. 4). 

Dave was another membei' of tlie 
1!)1S class who brought honor to it by 
being elected to the presidency of a 
Boston College Club. He guided wisely 
and well the many and complex matters 
dealing with the affairs of the Brockton 
B. C. Club, which was second in finan- 
cial status and strength of numbers 
only to the Halem B. C. Club. Dave 
was never censured for being late; he had one of those much 
desired but i-aiely secured late-permits. Owing to the fact that 
Dave lived at such a great distance from this noted institution of 
leai'ning, he was unable to devote much time to any college activ- 
ities other than studies. The marks on his reports, however, show 
that he attended well to the latter. 

Xever a felloAv to exjjress himself in many 
words, Dave Avas always found l)y the 
class ready to make the full sacrifice of time 
and comfort for the class's interest. It is 
that attribute of self-sacrifice that will be 
most noticed by those who come in contact 
with him in the future. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



WILLIAM E. DALEY 

Uorcliestev 

"jN o(r, //) ri'f/ard lo the Year Bitiik" 

Class Biisehill il. 2): CImss Fdntlall |1); Cl.-iss 

Ildcke.v (o. 4): 'J'rack {>'>); P.usiiies-: .Maiia^'er 

Sub TuKHi (4) ; Vice-l'i-fsideiit Itadio ( 'Uili 

(4): Suiiike Talk Coiimilttet:' (4). 

To Bill's business acumen are we 
iiulebted to a very great extent for the 
huge success of this present vohune. In 
the face of the difficulties which con- 
fronted the class in the attenqit to {)ut 
out our first real war-book, difficulties 
which are best known to the Editor, and 
in si)ite of the unusual expenses attendant upon the publication of 
this volume. Bill saw to it that the financial end of the book 
"came tln-ough." For this the class should feel deeply indebted 
to him. 

Feeling that a knowledge of radio could not be valued too 
highly, the two Bill's — Cashin and Daley — were instrumental 
in forming the present Radio Club, most of whose early mend)ers 
had aviation ambitions. 

Truly one of the class's leading scholars and a thorough worker 
and skillful business man, as the Year 
Book will show, Bill enjoyed the friend- 
ship of everyone in the class. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JOHX J. DAXAHY 

Caiuhridgv 

"J awn" 

Cliiss l!aseli;ill ll. 2) : Sodality- (1. li. 8. 4). 

Jolin came from the University City 
with a well-grounded conviction that 
study was to be his chief line of en- 
deavor; true, such a determiuatiou was 
only in keeping with the traditions of 
the city from which John hailed. Xext 
to his interest for studies he was famous 
for his friendship for Joe Sullivan ; 
we would have been surprised had we 
even once seen the two deprived of the 
soothing influence of each other's com- 
pany. r>e it known that they were inseparable. Certainly the 
coalition was of advantage to John, for through Joe he made 
many downtown ac(|uaintances who are on the Qui rive for 
good men. 

We don't know the bank of which John is to be president; 
wherever he goes, however, he will be a valuable ^^^^ 

asset, for his level-headed judgment and his L '^^fi 

cheerfulness in accepting given tasks will make (-^ 

him a valued man. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



WILLIAM T. DOHEETY 

Jamaica Plaiji 

"B((xk<'IJKlU is (■(illlilH/ (lloiKJ pile" 



CUiss Football (T, 4) 

Basketball (3 1 

as;ei- (4) ; 



Class 1-iaseball (1. 4i ; N'arsity 
Varsity Basketliall Maii- 
^odality (1. •_', :',. 4). 




Gentlemeu, you are uow face to face 
with him who guided the basketball des- 
tinies of the college during our last 
two years on the Heights. Basketball 
'is a rather recent sport at the college, 
and as such has not met with the suc- 
cess and that publicity which the major 
sports have enjoyed. Suffice to say, hoAvever, that liilly's work both 
as a player and manager has been of the highest caliber and sutti- 
cient to warrant the assertion of Bill's friends that the sport will 
soon come into its own at the Heights. 

Our hero is an extremely quiet chap, one from whom the world 
would not expect managerial ambitious to emanate; however, 
you all know the oft-rejjeated saying that still waters run deep. 
Its a])])lication is certainly true in this case. Bill 
is so deep that even the philosophical minds of the 
class have not yet reached the depths of his 
capacities. Ivnowing that actions speak louder than 
words, we will let Bill's actions speak for him ; ami 
they will predict success. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




CHARLES J. DOXAHUE 

Lcuvreiice 

"Xoir irc'll (jive tlic sfM7or\s lionipipc" 
Cl.-iss F.:isel::ill (1): Ktidlo ("hili (4): SodMlity (4). 

If i)olitical success depended entirely 
uijon poi)nlai'ity, "Jiggs" Avonld be the 
next mayor of Lawrence. His name of 
"Jiggs" is not inapi^ropriate, for have 
you ever ]^noA^^l of a man named Dona- 
hue who has not been called "Jiggs"? 
In this Donahue case, however, the 
name has a special significance with 
the boys of 191S, for it will not be hard for them to recall his 
version of the Sailor's Llornpipe, executed while he was adorned 
with Flaherty's hat and Hoban's coat. He looked as sea-going 
as any of our sailors in this "rig." 

"Jiggs" was a live wire, possessing a disposition which was 
hard to ruffle. To emphasize his thoroughness in whatever he 
undertook, we point to his radio Avork. He was one of the class's 
leading chemists, leading the chemistry class to the lunchroom. 

His election to the presidency of the Law- 
rence B. C. Club was the Avay in which his felloAv 
students acknowledged his i)opularity and re- 
warded his faithfulness. "Jiggs" is one of those 
fellows on whom one can count to go through 
with him to the limit. If eA^er the occasion arises, 
any member of 1918 Avill go through with him 
to the limit. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



WILLIAM F. CONNELLY 

Jamaica Plaiu 

''Buck" 

"Wlicre's the himch?" 
Var.sity KaseluiU (1. 2. 3) ; Stucleut A. A. (2). 

''Buck" was a specialist in athletics ; 
it was 111)011 baseball that he concen- 
trated his energies, and any Boston 
College man can tell tou how well 
he did. His catching for three sea- 
sons on the A'arsity baseball teams made 
for him a name as one of Boston Col- 
lege's greatest catchers. We cannot say 
enongh about his ability to hit, his all-around playing and espe- 
cially his throwing to bases ; most of all we Avould mention his 
thorough good sportsmanship. Rather is it needless for us to 
mention these, for "•Buck's" fame will ever be discussed Avherever 
Boston College men meet. 

"Buck" belonged to the famous (tuu Club — of which you may 
have read previously — and he participated in its classic cross- 
country run. Like the rest of the 
boys from Jamaica Plain, he made 
good at college ; even now he is mak- 
ing good in the army. We know that 
he Avill make good anywhere. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JA]iIES A. DOXOVAN 

South Boston 

"Jim" 

'■'/ don't see the need of it" 
Class Baseball (2) ; Sodality (1. 2. 3. 4). 

Who of Its does not recall tliose days 
iu freslimaix wlieii Fr. McCxiviiey's melo- 
dious Yok'e struck terror to the hearts 
of many an tinwary classmate of ours? 
At this writing we recall more than one 
occasion when Jim was the ttnha])i)y 
victim of an unheralded attack which 
truly took him by surprise — as it did 
many others. We can assure the reader, 
however, that Jim Avas a model class- 
mate, always wide-awake to the fact that he must keep alive the 
reptitation that he brotight with him from Latin School. As a 
student he always held his own with the best; in other activities, 
however, he was almost unknoAAii, as his retiring disposition 
seemed to put a damper upon all efforts of his companions to place 
him in class oflflces. 

You must not think that Jim's sphinx-like 
silence Avas a drawback in itself ; on the contrary, 
it masked a depth of character which Jim's 
classmates admired and which they know will 
bring him tiltimate success. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JOHN A. DUNN 

Eocklafid 
"Dunny" 

Class P.asel)all (3, H) : Oass Footliall (3. 4) : Varsity 

F.askethall (2); Science Club (4): 

Sodality (1, 2, 3, 4) . 

. John was one of tliose cliaps wlio do 
not allow outside activities to interfere 
with the prime purpose of his college 
career — to any noticeable extent; we 
might make one exception to this state- 
ment, and this would be in the line of 
athletics. IJaseball and basketball were 
the activities in which John chose to do 
his bit; his opponents and team-mates 
can testify as to the extent of his 
ability as a pitcher. The same holds true for John's basketball 
skill. We have previously said that John was heart and soul in 
his studies ; particularly true was this of his interest in Chemistry. 
As a member of the poisoned gas brigade he helped to make our 
Economic and History hours the more enjoyable. Whether in 
the laboratory or on the ball field, whether at work or at play, 
John's work has created a lasting impression. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




JAMES H. DWYER 

"Wevmoutli 



^The Sphinx" 



P.Mseball (1. 2) ; Clas 
Sorlality (1. 2. 



Football a. -') ; 

:, 4). 



V^^e Avouldu't have knowu tliat Wey- 
Bioiitli existed liad we not numbered 
Jim among our members ; not that 
Jim advertised the fact much, for he 
was a rather quiet, unemotional sort of 
a chap. But you see we couldn't help 
knowing of the town, since Jim came 
from there. He Avas frequentl}' seen 
in consultation Avith Jim Lannin and 
John Dunn; we surmise that Jim was seelving advice as to how 
he would best guide the destinies of that hamlet. Jim was one 
who gave careful thought before he chose a course of action, and 
it is that quality of taking infinite care that is his most striking 
characteristic. We admire him for that power of concentration 
and careful deliberation which will ]irove of great worth to him in 
the Avorld of finance. 

Still waters run deep, they say, and 
while Jim has too modestly kept himself 
in the background, he has always given 
that impi-ession of strength of charactei- 
Avhich Avill meet any test, of a sincerity 
that cannot be doubted and of an earnest- 
ness of puri)ose that will serve Avell in 
the future. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



HARRY V. ENGLISH 

Andover 

riass Biiseliall (1. 2) : Sodality (1, 2. 3, 4). 

Hai'i'Y took tlie same long journey 

every morning tliat Roland Bateman 

did, and was none tlie worse for it. 

Coming from the town made famous for 

its "prep" school, lie was a chap of 

whom we exjjected great things, and 

in whom we Avere not disai)pointed. 

Harry's chief activity was study, and in 

that he succeeded well, as was proved 

by the esteem in which he was held by 

his professors. At this Avriting we can 

recall no student who dis])layed a greater interest in the college 

curriculum. His shell-rimmed glasses and general appearance 

betokened a dignity that eA^ery member of the class appreciated. 

His associations with our contemporary from Lawrence, however, 

tended to distract him from his seriousness of purjDose for their 

earnest and pi-olonged consultations were the objects of much 

curiosity and wonder on the part of the class. But, for all of that, 
Harry's friends in the 1918 class were legion, 
and they extend their wish to him for every 
success. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




FRANCIS J. FACEY 

C\iinbridge 

■'Don't Iff tJiciH f/ct (iiriii/ iritli it" 

<;ife Chill (1. Li. o. 41 : .Marquette (Hi: Assistant 

.Maiiajrer Haseliall (1!) : '8o(lalit.v (1, J, 

.■!. 4 1 : Class Baseball (ll. 

Frank bears the distinction of com- 
ing from tlie University City, together 
with many other young men of note in 
the class. But Franlv is more closely 
connected with the city than are the 
others ; he seems to be "on the inside." 
The political game always offered great 
enchantment for him. His particular 
ambition along these lines has been the 
legislation of a law i)roviding for the annexation of Boston to 
Cambridge and the removal of the State Hoiise to Harvard 
Square. 

Aside from his political aspirations Frank has found time to 
become a booster of the first water, particularly in athletics. He 
claims the honor of having been jjresent at every baseball and 
football game held at the Heights during his four year's sojourn 
there. We think he is right, for on many occa- 
sions he has come into class with a hoarseness 
in his voice characteiistic of a rabid rooter. 

He was also an active member of the 
"Proletariat" during the "Inquisition" and 
consequent agitation that stormed the atmos- 
phere at one time during the year. Evidently 
his i^ractice in Cambridge stood him in good 
stead. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




CHARLES S. FITZGERALD 

Dorchester 

"Fitzy" 

■■(lei into it. mill" 

Varsity Footliall (1. -J. 3, 4): Captain Foutliall (4); 

Students" Athletic Council (1, 2. 3, 4): Sodality 

(1. 2, 3. 4) : Maniuette (1. 2) ; Fulton (3. 4i. 

Coming to lis from B. L. S. with a 
fine intei'scholastic record as an all 
aronnd athlete, Charlie more than lived 
\i\) to Avhat had been expected of 
him. He certainly made a wonderful 
name for himself in Boston College ath- 
letics : for three years a "B" man in 
baseball, and in football the best and most nervy quarterback that 
B. C. ever had. We haA^e seen Charlie star for B. C. time and 
time again ; in our two most recent victories over Holy Cross there 
were times when he was the only man between the Holy Cross 
runner and our goal, and Charlie never failed to get his man. 
But those whose good fortune it Avas to witness that West Point 
game, when the mighty Oliphant, the country's supreme star in 
football, broke through B. C.'s line for seeming touchdowns, 
will remember that it was our sterling quarterback Charlie 
who l)y his marvelous open field tackling time and time again 

preA^ented a score. Ask any Boston 
College man Avhat he thinks of Char- 
lie, and the answer will ineAatably 
be, "He's one game quarterback." 
Bred from a family that has already 
sent three sons to the Avar, one of 
Avhom, an alumnus of Boston College, 
met a glorious death leading a raid 
on the German trenches, it is little 
Avonder that "Fitzj^" is the man he is. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



FEAXCIS X. FLAHERTY 

Dorchester 

'"Frankie" 

Marquette (1, 2) ; Fultou (3) : Sub Turri 
Representative (3). 

Frank was one of the new additions 
^^''^^H to 0111- class during senior, having been 

|M -*^^^k a member of the 1917 class as far as Ms 

_^H^^|^,.^^^^^ senior year, when a serious illness pre- 
^^^Wu^^^^^K ^'^uted him from continuing with 1917 
^BM^^^B^^^Br^ further. To us, however, he was a most 
^'^■PBBp^ welcome addition, as his record of activ- 

' "^ ity with his former classmates gave us 

great hopes of a live worker. In this 
expectation we were not disappointed 
for. while Frank's time was limited, he proved himself a most! 
engaging, obliging and interested classmate. His ready wit was 
noted and his ever-present smile had a fame all its own. The 
hajjpy moments passed in his comj^any will afford us many 
pleasant recollections. Frank is one of our many classmates who 
heard the call and entered the service of his country ; Ave venture 
to say that his capacity of making friends will account for much 
of the advancement which he is sure to 
meet. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




JOSEPH J. FORKESTEK 

Dorchester 

"J.J.Jr:' 

•'^,\'rap if up" 

Mai-quette (2) ; Fulton (4) ; Sub Turri (4) ; Track 

(L'l; I'assion I'lay (2, 3); A'ice - President 

P.. (J. A. A. (4) ; President Science Cliili 

(4) ; Class Hockey (4) : Sodality 

(1, 2, 3, 4) ; Class Baseball (1 i. 

Josepli J. figured in tlie piano-break- 
ing ei)iso(le ; but the faculty did not give 
him credit for it. So we who are not 
among the active iconoclasts and who 
did falsely accept credit for it, wish 
to give Ed Heislein, Tom Sheeran. 
Dick Crowley and Joe the credit that is rightly theirs. Joe 
has ever been an ardent booster of B. C, very rarely missing a trip 
to one of our games away from home, never missing a home game. 
ISTot only has he rooted, but Joe has gone out for college activ- 
ities. He is noted for his acting in the Passion Play. We all know 
what Joe did in the hockey games. Full credit was paid to his 
chemical talent in his election to the presidency of the Science 
Club. He was among those who persisted in making their 
presence felt at the Fenway, and believe us, 
he made one big splash. They thought he 
was so serious looking. They didn't know 
him. 

Before we close, let us say that Joe 
has ever shown himself a staunch loyalist 
to B. C, faithful and steadfast to his 
friends, one whose cheery spirits will not be 
quickly forgotten and Avhose friends are 
indeed fortunate. 

59 



■y''^^^. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




FRANCIS P. FRAZIER 

New toil 

"JoAt" 

"Mr. ('liainiiiiH . I irisli tu kiii/ a fcir innrhs" 

Sdilality (1. -2. :j, 4) : Fulton (H. 4) : Maninrtte (I, 2) ; 
Science Cluli (4). 

"Jake" was one of our most astute 
followers of the art of practical pol- 
itics; many demonstratious of this art 
attended by more or less success have 
been afforded us by our Newton col- 
league. We attribute this quality to 
"Jake" because we believe that he has a 
leaning towards this line of endeavor; 
we judge from the many opportunities grasped by him to occuj^y 
the public forum in order that he might gain experience. If 
experience in voluntary debate or in discussions over class affairs 
means anything, "Jake" will be a second Daniel Webster. Recall, 
felloAv classmates, with what eager anticipation the period for 
voluntary debate in the Fulton Avas looked forward to; recall 
"Jake's" ex tempore sj^eeches. 

"Jake's" every action shoAved clearly to his fellow classmates 
that he Avould Avork hard and unselfishly for the 
glory of any body of Avhich he was a member. His 



AA^hole-hearted interest in eA'^ery thing B. 
Avhat endeared him to liis classmates. 



C. Avas 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



FEANCIS P. GALLAGHER 

Stoiieliaiu 

''Gal" 

"The ('rit\([uc VJiih hay a dale toiiif/Iil" 

Arnnuiette (1, L' ) : Fiiltcm Cil ; Class P.aseliall (1 I ; 
Sddality (1. i' i . 

Old "Gal" attained prominence from 
his very first days in freslinian ; his red- 
hot speeches in the Marquette, his fiery 
declarations in class, his intensely in 
terestiiig- speeches during class meet 
ings, his caustic remarks concerning the 
conservative element in the Fulton 
Debating Society made us realize that 
we had a very forceful mend>er in the gentleman from Stoneham. 
It was "Gal" who arranged for the debate and entertainment in 
Stoneham before his local council that was the direct cause of the 
formation of the ('riticjue C'lub. Many a time and oft did he thrill 
public audiences by one line in particular — the entire class knows 
it — "King Henry of Xavarre." "Gal" was a red-hot Republican 
and he certainly was strong in his arguments. 

"Gal" was one of the first of the class to join the colors; his 
patriotic fervor deprived us of continuing 
oui' ])leasant associations with him. We 
fondly hope that we will renew them at an 
earlv date. 





61 



1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




FKAXCIS A. GATELY 

Roxbiiry 

■•Tlic KiKlfrliikrr xoiii) iioir for Hohj Cross" 

lilee ('lull (1. L'. 3, 4); Leader Glee Club (4); 

^ranuiette C^ ) : Science Club (4); Student 

Athletic Council (]. 1^. 3. 4) ; Passion Play 

13) : Sodality (1, 2, 3, 4). 

"SSkimiv" did a iiumbei' of things of 
which we might write. He showed his 
first lie]) when we saw him as onr 
snapi)Y cheer-leader and Boston College 
is indebted to him for many a ncAV song 
and cheer. He continued his good work 
in the Passion Play; senior saw him 
rewarded with the leadershii) of the Glee Club. That was "Skinny" 
all over, interested in anything that the college or the class might 
do. Track alone of the sports secured his active services, but the 
baseball and football teams owe much of their success to the 
singing and cheering led and inspired by "Skinny." 

So much for his outside activities ; let us mention what he did 
in studies. It is a well known fact that he was one of the class's 
leading scholars, but Chemistry was his forte. His middle name 
must have been "Industrj^" if we judge 
from the hours which he jDut in at the 
laboratory. This trait will be the foun- 
dation of his future success. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



THEODORE S. GILLESPIE 

East Boston 



A'urslty lUiseliall (-2, oi: S(id;ilit.v ( 1, 
Hockey (ll: Baseball (1). 



'■'>) 



This is "Ted" Uillespie, one of the 
best lilved meu of the (dass, and one of 
whom the class has good reason to be 
l)roud ; he was one of the first to enlist 
and he joined a real fighting outfit, the 
old Ninth of Boston. We were not a 
bit surprised to learn that he "got right 
in," for he always met trouble s(iiiarely. 

If athletic training counts for any- 
thing, "Ted" was well prepared, at least as far as physical fitness 
counts. One has but to look at "Ted's" record to find out that he 
he was an athlete of no mean note; a member of our freshman 
hockey and baseball teams, proving himself of varsity caliber in 
his sophomore year, he made no small name for himself along 
these lines. Well liked by everyone because his was the happy 
faculty of making and retaining friends, "Ted" carried to France 
the best wishes of his host of B. C. friends. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




THOMAS A. GILDEA 

Koxbury 

"Beef" 

"Strp iij) (iiid hit it" 

N'.-irsity r.;iseli,-ill (1. -. '-i. 4) : ("aptaiu (o. 4 » ; Cuacli 

I4i: Class Hockey {3, 4); Class Footliall 

112. ;). 4) ; Studeut A. A. (4) : 

Sodality (1, 2. 8. 4). 

Let us introduce to you oue of the 
luightest of Boston College's "cliamoncr' 
stars, "Beef" Gildea. Talk about Bos- 
ton College baseball and you naturally 
talk about "Beef," and vice versa. From 
his freshman year when he made the 
varsity through his whole college course 
in which lie led the team in batting, Tom has made an enviable 
record that was rewarded when the team elected him captain for 
both junior and senior. When among other things, the war de- 
prived us of a coach, the college naturally turned towards "Beef," 
and he "made good." Pitted against some of the best professional 
college coaches in the country, "Beef" time and time again brought 
us victory; the team he coached made the best record that any 
Boston College team ever made. It was he 
who did what Boston College coaches had for 
twenty -five years vainly attempted, overcom- 
ing Holy Cross in a baseball fray. 

"Beef's" baseball record speaks for him as 
an athlete ; the class now speaks for him as a 
good fellow, a fine stiident, and the kind of a 
friend ujjon whom they can depend to the last. 



64 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



CLARENCE W. GREENE 

Soiilli Boston 
-DocN the (jcntlriiiaii irisJt to huUiv hi itT' 

Sodtility (1. 2. :j. 4) : (/lass Baseball (1. ::i ; 
Uafflf Coiiiiiilttee (4). 

Clarence was a fellow who liad a 
very seai-cliing mind, wisliiug to know 
the whys and wherefores of everything. 
Many a class meeting bronght out this 
trait ; his inquiry as to the famous bath 
was one of his most noteworthy deeds. 
The class recalls how a prominent mem- 
ber of the r.olsheviki felt complimented 
at the inquirv. Clarence was a chap 
whose record at Latin School in the classics gave us great expec- 
tations, in which we were not disappointed. He was no less inter- 
ested in the affairs of the class than any other loyal member; as 
a matter of fact we would do him an injustice if we denied him 
the prominent part he played in our meetings and if we did not 
tell of the great eagerness with which the class awaited his every 
remark. Coming from South Boston, Clarence upheld the fine 
traditions of that district and proved himself a 
cheerful friend, an entertaining speaker and a 
well loved classmate. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




EDWARD F. GROBOSKI 

Hyde Tai-k 

■■/ IIKlkc (I IIKltlDIl" 

Sotl.-ility (1. 2. ;;. 4) ; A'arsity Track Sijiiad C!) : Class 

Kdcitliall Cii: Class Baseball (1): Class 

Itaskvtltall CM; Maniuette C.M. 

"Ed" was always making some sort 
of motion; in fact, his motions made 
liim famous. At every class meeting he 
was thoroughly alive to the needs of the 
class, for lie never hesitated to make 
any motion he considered necessary, 
^lotion seems to have been a part of his 
very nature, for the speed with Avhich 
he covered the 100 and 220 brought him many a victory and the 
class many jjoints in class meets. We were afforded many mani- 
festations of this same s])eed when "Ed" was a candidate for the 
baseball and football teams. 

The foregoing qualities endeared him in the hearts of his 
classmates; his frank, open countenance and his pleasing manner 
made him a friend of all of lis. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



■■II i.- 



WILLIAM J. GROSS 

Dorchester 

''Bill" 

(titxninti'hi iiccc.sniiri/ far Ihc 

of the Dlltillf/" 

till II 



;(MlMlit.v ll. li) 

l''r;ii]eis Thiiiiiiisd 
|4| : Outii 



('i)iitriluitiii^' K(Utiir 
AcMdeiny (4i : Fiilton 
I'diiiiuittfc (4i. 




The class made a wise choice wlieii 
Bill Avas elected chairman of the out- 
ing committee. His arraugemeuts on 
that most notable of all days were 
perfect, even to the slightest detail, 
flis foresight was very commendable. 
Bill proved himself a staunch believer 
in tradition when with the famous Thirty he fought against a most 
radical change in the outing plans, and stood by the man who 
spoke those immortal words : "We are thirty strong and we want 
our rights." 

Bill was one of the class's best known literateurs, having 
contributed largely to Tlic Sfi/lus's literary success during his 
four years at the Heights. He lacked, however, the forwardness 
characteristic of many other writers, and should 
perhaps be censured for his retiring dis])osition. 
However, his talents will always meet with rec- 
ognition ; the value of his friendship has always 
been recognized bv an admiring ch^ss. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




DAJNIEL J. HARKINS 

Dorchester 

''Danny" 

■■It is i/oiir hook. Mniicij is tight, fellows" ■ 

SlKikesiieiu'eaii I)nuii;itics (1. 2) ; I'assion Play (2, 3) ; 

Uraiimtie Club (4) : Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4) : Mar- 

ijuette (1. 2) : Marquette Vice-l'resideiit (2) ; 

Fulton (3, 4) : Fulton Lecture Band (4) : 

Ciinnneucenient Speaker (4) ; Class 

Baseball (1) ; Class Hockey (4) ; 

Track (2. 3); Edltor-in- 

Cbief Sun Tltrri (4). 

Idleness is not a part of this man's 
make-up; tlie record outlined above 
gives ample j^roof of this fact. From 
the very first time when he appeared in 
"Ilamlel," iu which his costnme made a decided imjjression on 
those who paid especial attention to the "Play within the play," 
lip to the thunderous ai)plause that he received when as "Dathian" 
in the "Passion Play" he hurled "Judas" with great vigor and 
greater noise to the stage floor, his acting has never been incon- 
s])icuous. As for debating, his Marquette and Fulton records are 
all to his credit, but he is proudest of all of his position as pres- 
ident of the immortal Critique Club. There 
were those, however, who did not share in that 
pride, and it is a Avell known fact that that 
organization soon went "out of business." 

His greatest achievement in our eyes is 
the publishing of this our War-Book ; knowing 
that his editorial skill will be attended to far 
better by the mute testimony of this book than 
by any Avords of ours, we present the Editor 
to you. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



EDWAED B. HEAPHY 

Beverly 

"There, is crooked irork .soincirliere'' 

JIarquette (1) ; Orchestra (1, 2) ; Sodality (1, 2, 3, 4) : 
Clee Club (3, 4) ; Fulton (4) ; Dance Commit- 
tee (4) ; Fulton Publicity Committee (4). 

"Gentlemen of tlie jury, the prosecu- 
tion now rests its case;" so speaks 
Prosecuting Attorney "Ed" in 1923. At 
least that is the prediction of his fellow 
classmates, men who more than any 
others ought to know "Ed's" future. 
How do they know? Well, you see, it's 
this way : "Ed" always impressed us as 
having a legal mind; he was ever weighing the pros and the cons, 
always searching into the reasons of things. Perhaps the best 
instance of this trait — for such it was — was "Ed's" long-to-be- 
remembered defense of the down-trodden proletariat. All who 
Tieard him on that occasion marvelled at his skill in presenting in 
concise speech the well-kno-s^Ti facts of the case. 

We need not tell you that "Ed" is a well-liked chap ; if he had 
not been, his defense of the proletariat would 
have made him so. Fine fellow that he is, he is 
sure to be followed by the class's best wishes for 
his success. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




EDWIX C. HEISLEIN 

Newtonville 
"Ed" 

"Yoii'iJ ought to xcr — " 

Manmette (1. '!) : Treasurer Marquette (2); Fulton 

(I). 4) : Dance Connnittee (4); .Orcliestra 

(1. iM : Sodality (1. 2, 3, 4): Sur 

TriiHi (4) : I!adio Clul) (4». 

"•Ed" bails from Xewton, and like 
the rest of tlie boys from that town, was 
not content to sit back and watch others 
do things, bnt ijreferred to take an 
actiA'e ijart in whatever the class under- 
took. His unflagging interest while he 
was a member of the debating societies 
was rewarded by his election to the treasurership of the Marquette 
Debating Society. As an active member of the orchestra he sac- 
rificed much of his time in order to entertain when possible. As 
a member of our famous dance committee his work was so modest 
that it escaped the notice of the Bolsheviki. As a member of the 
Sub Turri staff he was the official photographer of the book. Let 
it also be said that he was numbered among the active iconoclasts. 

Thus you see that "Ed's" college life has 
not been entirely idle. The devoted interest 
that he manifested in class activities applied 
in business will assure him of a bright 
future. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




DANIEL F. HERLIHY 

Cambridge 
''Dan'' 

"Aitji Sti/liiK Hiijiici/ ill llir croird:'" 

Mai-qviette (2 I ; Fulton (3, 4) ; Footlial! C^. 31 ; S.xl.-il- 

ity (1, L', :-J. 4): Prefect Sodality (4): Passiou 

I'lay CJ. 3) ; Sum Tx'hiu (4) ; (ilee Cluli C2. .",. 4). 

IJehold aiiotlier one of the University 
City lads who have honored the chnss by 
associating with us here at the college 
iOv the past tonv years. Somehow oi- 
other we think that the atmosphere oi' 
Dan's home city must be surcharged 
witli mirth. It never paid to have the 
blues while Dan was around; in fact, one couldn't have them, 
or preserve his dignity. Dan's laugh was so infectious that 
one could not avoid catching the spirit of it. We guess that Dan 
needed it in his business of 8ti/lus financial agent; he carried it 
as part of his stock in trade, and it never failed to get results. 

After class hours Dan and "Mac," "Red" and Eiley had a 
jieculiar habit of hieing away to the bleachers. Some said it was 
to study; others said it was to discuss the 
war. But nobody knew. Some there were 
who thought that these were meetings of the 
Rifle Club. For several reports were heard, 
among which was the report to "see the 
Dean." But Dan, exj^ert rifleman that he 
was, was never found guilty of shooting any- 
thing but legitimate game. 

We vouchsafe to predict for Dan a 
marked degree of success in his chosen work. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



WILLIAM F. HEELIHY 

Haverhill 

■'Get your head out of the way" 

Class Baseball (1. 2) ; Sodality (1, 2, 3, 4) : 
Class Football (2). 

Xot the least of the fond recollec- 
tions which Avill ever be recurring to lis 
in the years to come will be the manj^ 
langhs afforded ns by onr friend Bill. 
Some thei-e are who make merry by 
their witty words, others by their 
mirth-prodncing antics. Bill was one of 
the latter. When the sun held forth 
Bill was generally a negligible quan- 
tity as a rival to Charlie Chaplin, but 
Avhen old Jupiter Pluvius held sway Bill was in his element. 
His sleight of hand performances with the footgear that is usually 
worn on damp days made all sit up and take notice. 

As a comedian Bill has few equals; as a man he has mani- 
fested throughout his entire course a personal touch which augurs 
well for his future welfare. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JOHN J. HOBAN 

Somerville 

''Hobey" 

"Hair's your friend?" 

Fivslimaii Biiseliall : Sophomore Baseliall ; Maniuette 
(1. 2) ; SoflalUy C, 2. 3. 4). 

Somerville sent us another good fel- 
low in John who, like the rest of his 
fellow townsmen, leaves behind him 
pleasant memories. He was one of 
those fellows who could see the pleasant 
side of everything, and his chief joy in 
life was to boost. He was a great 
booster of home talent; we have inves- 
tigated and have found that, as John says, there are some i)retty 
nice people living out in Somerville. This is only an instance of 
his bi'oadmindeduess ; in fact, we can say that there was nothing- 
narrow about him. In keeping with this attribute his edifying 
api^earance as cross-bearer caused many a jjious sentiment to 
spring. 

The best testimony to John's character was the esteem in 
which he was held by his friends ; he was always 
found to be a lo.yal, true, ever cheerful and thor- 
oughly dependable fellow. 





73 



1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




THOMAS S. HURLEY 
Koxhnrv 

■■('•Ice Vluh iiicctincj this afternoon" 

.M.u(|uctti' il. -J) : Fulton (3) ; Glee Club (1, 2, 3) ; 

l.c.-ulfr (J!) : Class Secretary (2. 3) ; 

Class FoiitbaJl (1 ). 

"If you have got to talk, boost; if 
you've got to knock, keep your mouth 
sliut" seems to have been "Sid's" motto, 
lor we tiiul it hard to remember a time 
when lie sjioke other of a person than to 
boost. A kind of a quiet chap, "Sid" 
Hurley left us to join the navy, leaving 
behind memories that will ever be sweet 
and pleasant. He was one of the char- 
ter members of the Boosters' Club, 'way back in the dim i)ast of 
our freshman year. "Sid" was a loyal and true Booster. 

He was always working for the betterment of B. C, emulating 
the example of his tine old dad. B. C'.'s glory was his aim, and he 
always worked with that end in view. 

"Sid's" special field was the (xlee Club. He was one of its stars 
and was elected leader for junior and senior. 
He "put on times" at many outside towns, espe- 
cially Stoneham and Marl)lehead, where large 
evenings were enjoyed by all. As a member of 
the mob he did his bit for the Passion Play; as 
our class secretary he enjoyed the esteem and 
confidence of all. 

We know that we do not overstep the bounds 
of propriety when we say that his vim in all his 
past activities assures him of the attainment of 
many a coveted goal in the world. 

74 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



MARTIN F. KANE 

South Boston 

"■Marty" 

"A Inrfje crcniiifj, no to xitcak" 

(M.-iss I'.iiseliall (1, 2) : Sodality (1. 2. 3, 4» : Marquette 

(21 : FtUtoii la. 4); President Fultdii (4): Cap 

and (idwn Coniniittee (4) : I'assicin Play (2. S). 

" Marty " is our genial classmate 
from South Boston. His business acu- 
men has been demonstrated to us time 
and time again, but in none so forcible 
way as by his work on the Cap and 
Gown Committee. As chairman of that 
committee "Marty" handled that im- 
portant class matter to the satisfaction of all. His social prom- 
inence was well known to his classmates ; more than once the social 
functions of the South Boston B. C. Club, of which "Marty" was 
treasurer, paid mute testimony to his standing in society. 

The foregoing qualities would make any man a mark of 
distinction among his classmates; but "Marty" had the added 
distinction of holding the honored position of president of the 
/ -) Fulton Debating Society. A truly marked man 

was he. We feel certain that his talents will con- 
tinue to make him a marked man and in a greater 
degree than heretofore. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



FEANCIS G. KELLEHEE 

Brookline 

"Kel" 

Oi-chestra (1, i, 3. 4) : Orchestra Director (2. 3. 4) ; 

Sodality (1. 2, 3. 4) ; Picture Committee (4) ; 

Daiiee Committee (4). 

Frank is one of tlie class's best 
known nmsical artists, having been a 
member of onr orchestra for four years. 
After one year's playing be was elected 
leader, a position he held for the re- 
mainder of his college career; those 
who have heard the orchestra under his 
leadership will never forget its playing. 
Another testimonial to the esteem in 
which Frank was held by his classmates 
was shown by the fact that he Avas chosen to serve on two com- 
mittees, a practice, which you recall, was frowned upon by the 
famous Bolsheviki. Frank also served as a pleasing entertainer 
at many of our smoke talks and Home Nights. 

In class his attitude was always that of one who realizes that 
he must do every task thoroughly. The traits that he has shown 
during our associations with him, the ability to inspire confidence, 
a readiness to offer his services in whatever 
capacity they might be used, and an ability 
to achieve results, will stand him in good 
stead in his future work. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



EDWARD L. KICKHAM 

Bi-oolvJiue 
''Eddie'' 

"Where's the hoolcf" 

Mai-uuette (1. 2) : Fulton (3) ; Passion Play (li. 3) : 

Atbletic Council (1, 2) ; Glee Club (1. 2, 3) : 

Business Manager Glee Clnli (3t. 

Witli "Jasper'- Clear, "Ed" claims 
the distinction of being the first of 191S 
to receiA'e a commission in the army ; he 
received it at the Second Plattsbujg 
Camp, and as a result did not resume 
studies with us in our senior year. The 
pleasant associations which he had 
formed during his three years of college 
life made us miss him keenly. From the 
threshold of his college days to the time when lie finished junior, 
"Ed's" college life was a busy one; a zealous member of the Mar- 
quette and Fulton Debating Societies, an associate of ours in the 
Glee Club of which he Avas business manager during its most 
successful season, a member of the Passion Play cast and a repre- 
sentative of the class in its Student Council — a creditable record, 
to be sure. In all these activities he showed the (piality of devotion 
-^^^^ to duty which should stand him in good stead in his 

Y^ jiresent capacity and which will lead to his ultimate 

success. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



ARTHUR J. KILEY 

Faueuil 

"Art- 

••I'll sell a hundred tickets" 

Class iMMitl-all (1. 3. 4) : Class Baseball (1, 4) : Class 
I'.asketliall (iM: Varsity Basketball (3); So- 
dality (1,2,3.4): Science Club (3) ; Radio 
Club (4»; Secretary Hadio Club (4), 

It is our privilege to introduce to 
you a "stauncli supporter of everything 
IJ. ('.,'" no less a personality than Friend 
Arthur. It is quite a task to be a 
staunch supporter, a man with real 
"pep" who does more than talk. We 
assure you, however, that Arthur "tills 
the bill." We cannot say enough for 
Arthur's loyalty; few can boast of having Avorked so faithfully 
and of having achieved such substantial returns as he has in his 
four years" sojourn at the Heights. 

Particularly keen has been his interest in athletics. He it was 
who proved that he who watches on the sidelines can do as much 
for the game as he who by his brawn and skill wins the victory on 
the athletic held. He it was Avho talked Boston 
College athletics to all with whom he came in 
contact ; one need only have talked with 
Arthur to be convinced that Boston College 
Avas "ace high" in athletics. A true sports- 
man, Arthur will not soon be forgotten by his 
classmates. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



JOHN M. KIEKE 

iSoiiiei\ille 

''Jonno" 

"Conic out 1(1 Koiiicrvillc B. V. Ddiicc for 
(I good tunc" 

Ajirsity Footliiill (1. li. :! ) ; Sodality (1. I'l; 
Dance ('oiiniiitti-'e (4). 

There must be somethiug in tlie 
atmosphere of Somerville that makes 
its B. C. representatives such "social 
lions." John was not unlike his brothei- 
Somervillians in this respect; his ])ro- 
clivities along social lines Avere well 
known to every member of the class. As president of the IJoston 
College Club of Somerville John "put on" the most enjoyable 
event in the B. C. social calendar of last year; a large evening was 
enjoyed by all. In the athletic line he was just as prominent; he 
plaA'^ed regular end on the varsity for two years running. Injuries 
received while doing masterly work as a regular put an untimely 
end to his brilliant football career. Biit his 
football prowess has earned for him a niche 
in B. C.'s hall of fame and will always stand 
as his big glory. John Kirke, during his four 
years at B. C, proA^ed himself a regular felloAv. 
one who would stick by his friends till the last, 
and worthy of everybody's respect. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JAMES L. LANNIX 

Kocklaiul 

''Doc" 

"Sure" 

• 'hiss liaseliiill (1.2): Class Football (1, 2) : HoUality 
ll. 1'. .'i. 4) : Passion I'lay (2). 

Tortoise-shelled glasses usually give 
tlie wearer the appearance of calm tlig- 
uity and unruffled state of mind, of deep 
seriousness of purpose. Tortoise-shelled 
glasses, however, could not hide Jim's 
cheery disposition and bright manner 
which won tor him so many friends in 
the class. Jim belonged to the famous 
(piartette — popularly known as the inseparable and up-and-doing 
four — Dw^yer, Dunn, Lannin and Sweat ; Ave should also have said 
that they wei-e invincible, for they were balked in the accomplish- 
ment of nothing. Jim's acting in the Passion Play was the kind 
that pleases an audience; he made a distinct hit. 

"Doc" was the kind of fellow that the class was glad to have 
numbered among its men ; wherever Ave 
may meet Jim in the days to come Ave 
can feel sure that there AA^e shall haA'e a 
friend who will do his utmost for his 
friends. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



DANIEL J. LEAEY 

Fiiltiiii (8) : Sodality Cii. 

Lynn's contribution to the Class of 
1918 was Daniel J. Leary. At that, the 
contribution was rather late, for Dan 
spent his first two college years with 
our fair and much beloved sister col- 
lege, on the hills of Worcester. Pre- 
vented from entering senior Avith us by 
reason of his entrance into service, 
Dan was no small figure in our class 
affairs during his one year with us. 
In class meetings his lengthy argu- 
ments won for him much attention from his hearers ; in the Fiiltou 
Debating Society that gift of speech made for him such a reputa- 
tion that he was elected vice-president of that organization for 
the senior year, a position which circumstances prevented his 
coming back to fill. The (luiet dignity of his bearing, manifested 
upon all occasions, together with his forensic ability, lead his 
fellow classmates to expect great things. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




LEO J. LYNN 

Chelsea 

SiKlalit.v (.1. -1. -A. i) : Basketball (1, 2. 3) : Class 
Baseball (1) ; Dauce Conmiittee (4). 

Chelsea became famed iu the eves of 
the world wheu a certain conflagration 
took place within its borders ; Chelsea 
became famed in the eyes of Boston 
College by the advent of Leo in 1914. 
From onr very freshman days we were 
led to a realization of Leo's sterling- 
character, a realization which became 
more and more firmly imbedded in our 
minds as our class days rolled by. He 
was known to us as one of the college's most skillful basketball 
l)layers, having earned his reputation by his snappy work on 
college and class teams. In this as in everything he did his work 
well ; that determination of doing the task in hand well is going 
to be the main reason for Leo's success. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



J. PAUL LYNCH 

Koxbury 

"■Paul" 

"Well, rciiUji, Mr. CliairiiHui, I don't scf — " 

Class Baseliall (1, 4) ; Chairniau Dance Coiiiiiiittcc 

(4) : Class Hockey (4) ; Class Football 

(4) : Clee Club (1, 2, 3, 4). 

From the very first day when he 
became a member of 1918, Paul Avas 
credited by his brother members as 
being oue of our best business men. 
Witness the results he obtained at our 
senior dance, a thoroughly enjoyable 
time whose financial success was the 
talk of the class ; his appointment to the soiree committee was a 
tribute to his former success. Great as were his propensities for 
business, greater yet was his athletic ability; hockey was the 
sport in which Paul excelled. We cannot forget his brilliant 
playing in varsity and interclass matches; he was an essential 
cog in our well-oiled, smoothly-Avorking and championshi]) hockey 
team. Now, as for his social life, Ave Avill never forget hoAV ready 
he Avas to exchange courtesies Avith his class- 
mates, and the privilege of dancing Avith his 
friends Avas sought hj many of the class. 
Trulv a remarkable felloAv Avas Paul. 





1918 



SUB TU RR I 



1918 




JOHN F. McCAETHY 

Cambridge 

"Mac" 

"Hey, Tom'' 

Alt Kditor Sub Tubbi (4) ; Class Baseball (1, 2, 
Sodality (3, 4) ; Glee Club (3. 4) : 
Class Hockey (3. 4). 



3,4) 



"^lac" is the class "Hobey Baker" 
who many times brought us to our feet 
by his thrilling dashes up the ice in 
that neA'er-to-be-forgotten inter class 
series. But his hockey proAvess is only 
one of the many causes for his fame. 
If, dear reader, in glancing through the 
book you are pleased with these drawings and cartoons, give the 
credit to "Mac." He has been our original gloom-killer ; for many 
times when the class has been depressed with cares or over- 
biirdened with studies or deep in political agitation, little Johnny 
disjielled all its worries. 

In class "Mac" offered a very learned front. His dark tortoise- 
shelled glasses served two purposes ; besides lending a degree of 
loftiness and distinction to the wearer they also served as a har- 
monizer, a sort of half-tone camouflage, a little relieving influence. 
For he was Tom Keynolds' partner in crime, and those tortoise- 
shelled glasses served as a relieving 



influence against Tom's bright au- 
burn locks. Both have received the 
rating of expert riflemen. 

The class is very proud of "Mac" 
as its eighteen-year-old graduate ; the 
class is very fond of "Mac" for he ever 
was congenial, thoroughly sincere 
and self-sacrificing. 

84 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



WILFRED C. MacDONALD 

Soineiville 

-Oh. hello" 

Sodality (l.l'i : (;iee<'liili (1.2.:!) : Class Footliall (1). 

When "Mac" enrolled as a student 
at B. C. he helped swell the legion of 
Boston College men from the city of 
Somerville, and he has ujjheld the best 
traditions of the men who have gone 
before him. While his nature has not 
been such as to tend to make him seek 
the ijublic eye, yet none will deny that 
his interest in behalf of the class as 
manifested by his untiring zeal has been most praiseworthy. 

"Mac" was unable to finish his course with us, for he was called 
to the colors ; proud should he be that he was the second member 
of our class to see foreign service, for he served in the raihvay 
engineers. Proud indeed are we to haA'-e such a man among 
our ranks. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



JOHX .1. McELENEY 

Wobiii-ii 

"iMac" 

"I II defense of the tliesis" 

Fiiltiiii i4i: Sodality (1. 2. :!. 41 : Vlce-I'i-efect 
Sodality U). 

^^"ol)Ul■ll contributed to the Class of 
11)18 one of its leading scholars in John ; 
medals and premiums have been his 
aAvard tor his faithful work, and we 
venture to say that he has in his home 
many a trophy of his intellectual suc- 
cesses. Judging from the scholastic 
record of "Mac" we would say that the 
environment of Woburn must be very 
conducive to study. Witness "Duke" Sullivan, Tom Sheeran and 
Joe Forrester. 

From the fact that John devoted almost all his efforts at college 
to the prime object, study, and that in his efforts he met with a 
success that was equalled by few, Ave credit him with the happj' 
faculty of concentration, Avhich Avith his other AA^ell knoAAm qua- 
lities of a pleasing ])ersonality and a determined 
perseverance Avill be the foundation of success. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



FEANCIS J. McNAMAKA 

Watertowii 

''Frank" 

Fi-eslimaii Basel)iill ; Class Kasketball (1. l' ) : Class 
Baseball (J): Varsity Kasketliall CSl: 
Sodality (1. i'). 

This is one of Watertown's flue 
sons; his career at Boston College has 
not been an idle one but rather one 
teeming with activity. Frank is one of 
those fellows who find more joy in 
working in an humble capacity for 
Alma Mater, knowing that his work, 
combined with the efforts of many 
others, Avill make for the ultimate success of the projects under- 
taken. And yet his retiring disposition is unable to keep him 
entirely out of the public eye ; his record as shown above will 
bring out the truth of this statement. In basketball Frank was 
considered one of the college's best assets ; he had a varsity posi- 
tion already assured him when an unfortunate injury deprived 
the team of his services. He proved himself 
a faithful member of both the Fulton and 
the class. We need say no more. 





87 



1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




JOHN J. McNAMAEA 

•Tamaica Plain 

"(lot to get hack to diilji" 

ClMss RjiseliMll (!) : I'Mssioii Play (2. 3): ScMlality 
(1. lil : Science <'liil> (o) : Class Football (2, M). 

It is not often that you see the face 
of a man who played the part of an 
apostle in our noted Passion Play and 
jjlayed it with such skill ; the picture 
uj) in the coi'iier shows one of our rep- 
resentatives in the Passion Play cast. 
John played his chosen part with the 
same quiet modesty that has character- 
ized everything that he has done at the 
Heights. We might say that it was not John's nature to thrust 
liiniself into tlie limelight; he preferred to be seen rather than to 
be heard. Early in our senior year he heard the call to arms and 
enlisted in the navy as a storekeeper. So great was his ambition 
that in spite of his being in service he was able to be with us in 
June and receive the degree of A.B. for which he had striven so 
zealously. His tireless activity and 
great capacity for work, his most will- 
ing co-operation in everything under- 
taken by the class, are reasons u])on 
which the class bases its prediction that 
John will make a name for himself. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



ANTHONY J. MAGUIEE 

Brighton 
"■Tony" 

"Till' 'rrcrifiuicr's: re [tort is" 

X'lirsit.v Haseliall (1, 2. 3) ; Fulton (4) : Treasurer 

Senior (4) ; Dance Committee (4) : Xarsitv 

Hockey (4) : Sodality (1, 2, 3. 4). 

As a mark of the confidence which 
his fellow classmates had in him, 
"Tony" was elected to the important 
office of treasurer of our senior class. 
Ilis entrance into service cost the class 
a favorite and faithful member and an 
efficient officer. A glance at the top of 
this page will show that his days at the 
Heights were not devoid of activity but Avere the mark of a busy 
man. Undoubtedly the fact that he was a member of the ball team 
that defeated Harvard was one of the principal reasons for his 
distinction. His repute gained by him as a hockey player was 
second only to that gained by him on the diamond. His faithful 
work in the Fulton rounded out a well balanced career of service 
for the class ; work as faithfully performed in the Heaw Artillery 
to which he is now assigned will Iwing him the success which he 
(leserA^es. 





1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




MICHAEL J. MAKER 

Cambridge 

''Mile" 

■'>s'o/y, CasJiiii" 

ClMss Hiiseliail (-!); Class Fuotliall (3): 
Sodality (1. 2). 

Behold the first "high-tlier" of the 
('hiss of 11)18. No, boys, we don't mean 
what you mean ; "Mike" is a real flier, 
an aviator of the first water. When, 
early in the war, the government issued 
a call for aviators and student aviators, 
"Mike" felt himself called, as did many 
others, to do his little bit for the Stars 
and Stripes. It was a big step for our 
classmate, for it meant the forfeiture of his academic degree and 
])er]ia]is his life, but he figured that it was none too big a gift to 
give to the land which gave him birth. And rightly too. Base 
indeed would be that man who, hearing his country's call, would 
turn a deaf ear to it. "Mike" realized that in no better way can 
a man die than in the defense of his country. He was following 
the dictate of his training received here at Boston College and 
which had been so aptly i)ut by the old Romans 
who — jiagans though they Avere — realized the 
truth of the words : "Dulce ci decorum pro 
patria mori." 

"Mike's" steady, persevering ways are sure 
to bring disaster to those of the enemy whose 
misfortune it is to meet him in mortal combat. 
We who know him feel certain that he will 
give a good account of himself. 




90 



1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




WILLIAM F. MALONEY 

Jamaica Plain 

-BUI" 

MiiiiiiKfr Hockey (4); ('la«s FootliMll (1, 2l: Chi 
H;iselinll (1. 2) : Picture Comniittee (4) : 
SodMlity (T, 2. 3, 4). 



liostoii Latin School sent us anotb(H- 
fine chap in Bill; he certainly jii'oved 
himself a credit to the institution from 
which he came. Bill's forte was ath- 
letics, having- played on the football 
team and having managed the varsity 
hockey team. Interclass athletics also 
received a share of Bill's attention, 
for he was prominent in class football and class baseball during 
our Avhole course. His athletic dealings made it necessary for 
him to attend the almost daily meetings which took place at 1.30 
in the athletic ofUce where in comjjany with "Art" WhoUey, "Beef" 
Gildea, "Buck" Donnelly and "Benny" Murray he helped guide 
the destinies of Boston College's athletics. 

We particularly envy those fellows becaiise they are partic- 
ular friends of Bill ; every member of the class Avas Bill's friend, 

but those fellows, owing to their 
close intimacy with Bill, were most 
fortunate. 

We cannot exaggerate Bill's good 
qualities ; rather are we afraid that 
we may not praise highly enough 
the vakie of his friendship. The con- 
fidence that we all have in his futuie 
success makes all wishes for his suc- 
cess unnecessary. But be it known 
that Bill is "some" boy. 

91 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




JOHN C. MAXLEY 

Rosliiulale 
"Connie" 

•■<)ii i/ijiir toi'x" 



Varsity P.asdiall (1. 2, 
Athletic Ciiuuoil ( 1. 



:!) : liaslvetliall (2, 3) ; Student 
1. 3, 4) : Secretary A. A. (4). 



When Bostou College defeated Har- 
vard 11 to 1, it was mostly due to "Con- 
nie's" work at shortstop that Harvard's 
score was kei)t doAvn ; he was here, there 
and everywhere, scooping them all in 
and "killing off" many a rap that 
seemed "labelled" a sure hit. When we 
played the Boston Red Sox, his work 
received high praise from the news- 
papers. He has been consistently brilliant at shortstoiJ for Boston 
College, but we again wish to state that his playing in that 
Harvard game will never be forgotten at the Heights. 

But for all his brilliancy "Connie" was known as the team's 
most modest and retiring member. He was intensely interested 
in class affairs, playing on all our class teams and contributing 
largely to our iuterclass victories. In class meetings he was 
always "on the job" both by suggestions and by more substantial 
means of support. 

We realized more than ever "Connie's" worth Avhen we lost 
him to the navy early in March, but our loss was the navy's gain. 

Quiet, unassuming, imbued with 
an intense college spirit, he takes 
with him the best wishes of the class ; 
through this book the class wishes to 
say that he is a man for whom no 
praise is too great. 

92 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



JOSEPH A. MULDOON 

Walt ham 

Sodality (1. 2, 3, 4) ; Science Club (4) ; Fulton (4) : 

Dance Committee (4) ; Class Baseball (1) : 

Class Football (1). 

Joe is a "molecule" of some note, 
having attained marked success along 
chemical lines under Father Ahern's 
tutelage. We have the word of Joe's 
brother "moleciiles" for this. Isn't it 
strange how molecules stand l).v each 
other? We who know Joe need not have 
been told that he was able to mix gas 
and flame with the best of the class ; 
many a time in the Economics cUiskS held in the Fulton room we 
hMve openly testitied to the telling force of your chemical powers, 
Joe. We knew that the gas and flame unit was practicing in the 
laboratory below. Perhaps that accounted for the lackadaisical 
spirit manifested by most of the economists. Perhaps. 

Joe is a sensible fellow, with plenty of gray matter in his head. 
We will not be surprised, nay, some of us will be sadly mistaken 
in judgment if Joe doesn't follow up chemistry. His 
past successes lead many to believe that the fore- 
„ ,-^ going will be his chosen profession. Mav success be 

V^/f/A'^^-' his wherever he goes. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




AKTHUR W. MURPHY 

Brookliiie 

■■Nr///, / mil II fririid of i/uurs last iiif/ht" 

.MaiKij;rr X^irsity FiiotliiUl (4) : Student A. A. (3, 4) ; 
<;ife Cliih {-2. -.',) : Class Baseball (1, 2). 

From eA-en the dim past of our Soph- 
omore days Arthur had bestowed upou 
him a title which was a compliment to 
his social and athletic prowess, a title 
which evei'vbody kuows but which we 
shall not mention here. Even in those 
days he used to carry a rogues' gallery 
around with him which one day brought 
him to grief. Sufiice to say that Arthur speedily acquired a new 
galleiy. As for his oratorical powers, his rendition of "Oh Cap- 
tain, my Captain" brought him undying fame. Imbued with that 
intense spirit of patriotic sacrifice which Boston College ideals 
foster, Arthur at the beginning of our Senior year enlisted in the 
navy. His crowning achievement was the managing of our 1918 
varsity football team, the best ever. 

Arthur's steady application, his untiring 
efforts, his marked zeal in caring for even the 
smallest detail, will make his life after college 
as fruitful and as eventful as were his college 
da vs. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




DANIEL J. MUEPHY 

Chelsea 
"i>a«" 

"Athlrlicifiiii" 

Miiniiiette (]. 2) ; JIaniuette I'rize Team (2 1 : ("lass 
Baseball (1. 2) : Fulton (3. 4) : Francis Tliunipsdn 
Academy (4): I^i-esideut Fulton 14): Dram- 
atic t'luli (4) : Oratorical Contest (ol ; 
Dance Committee (4); Chairman 
.Senior Smoker (4i; Fulton Lec- 
ture Team (4) : ■' D o m i " 
Editor N / // / II s (4) : 
N'aledietiiriaii (4). 

Uaii comes from tliat town made 
famous by that immortal poem, "Tlie 
Chelsea Fire," but in spite of that he 
made a name for himself as one of the 
class's leading orators. From the time that he spoke at the Mar- 
quette prize debate, through Oratorical Contests and other debates 
up to his delivery of the Valedictory Address, the greatest of 
oratorical honors, Daniel J. certainly has been kno^vn for his 
public speaking. 

Dan is also one of our noted social "lions," being seen quite 
often at the Fen\yay. He iigured in that little episode of the piano 
breaking, for which he received full credit. 
Dan never lacked for company at a ball 
game. 

Dan has been unflagging in his in teres' 
in college affairs, as a glance at his record 
will show. Whatever he had he Avas willing 
to offer for B. C.'s good, and he has left 
behind a record of which anyone may be 
proud. He will always be remembered as 
Dan of the ever ready smile, a likeable and 
engaging classmate. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




H. BENNETT MURRAY 

Koxbury 

"Bcnnie^' 

■•]]'(■ lire lliirti/ xfroiig. and ire diiiidiid 
our riyhts" 

I'resident Stuileiit A. A. (4) : Malla^'el■ Varsity I'.ase- 
l.all (4): Varsity Footliall (12, 3); Hocl^ey (4); 
Class Kaselmll (1): Class Football (1, 2); 
X'iee-rresiileiit Ci. 3) : Fulton (4) ; Pic- 
ture Conniiittee (4) : ItiuK Committee 
(41 : (ilee Club (1. 12. 3, 4) ; 
Sodality (1. J. 3. 4). 

As you can see from Beuiiie's record, 
lie Avas a \qvj busy mau; one page can 
hardly do him justice. He had some 
famoiis sayings — as famous as his deeds 
— "Aw, come on, fewwows," "We are thirty strong and we demand 
our rights," "I have here tickets for — ," and "Aw, cut it out." 
liennie's life at the Heights has been one of intense activity; per- 
haps we will be least apt to forget the saintly look he wore on his 
face at our Senior Retreat and his saintly appearance all-around, 
a truly remarkable picture. His version of the new song entitled 
''The Rosary" was quite wonderful. 

As a senior, Bennie managed Boston 
College's best baseball team; that was his 
crowning glory in regard to athletics, 
even though his work upon our varsity 
football and hockey teams had brought 
him much ci-edit. We know that the futui-e 
holds for him even greater successes. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




JOHN V. MUERAY 

Eevere 

"Vintiy" 

"Horses" 

Marquette (1, 2) ; President Maniuette (2) ; Maniuette 
Prize Debate (2) ; Fultou (2. 4) ; Censor Fulton 
(3); Oratorical Contest (3); Varsity Foot- 
ball (1, 2, 3) ; Class President (4) : 
President Boston College A. A. (4) . 

There are mauv titles which we 
might put under this young fellow's 
name — "The prince of all good fellows," 
"Boston College's most popular man," 
"The pride of Revere," or the "Joy of 
11)18" — and Vin would deserve them all. 
A one-page write-ui) cannot tell all that he did, but let it be said 
that the class will never forget the author of " 'Twas Christmas on 
the Island" and "He stood at the bar of justice" ; will always re- 
member him as the one who led the gang downtown after that 
memorable 17-14 win over Holy Cross and who made that wonder- 
ful speech opposite the Park Street Church, "I have travelled from 
the sunkist shores of California" ; will remember his playing at 
center for B. C. for three years, his lead- 
ing the mob through the hall of B. C. High, 
his rebuttal in the Mar(]uette Prize De- 
bate, his ai:>pearances with the Critique 
and Glee Clubs, the time when he stood up 
in class and said "The only way that you 
will get anything from them, fellows, is to 
fight them." For "Vin" — by the way, B. 
C.'s first naval officer — there will be a 
warm spot in the hearts of all B. C. men. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




GEEAED B. NEWMAN 
Gloucester 

"Jerry" 

Sodality (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Class Baseball (1) ; Class 
Footliall (1) : Dance Cmmiiittoe (4). 

The fact that Jerry comes from 
(xloiicester does not keep him from en- 
joying the distinction of being one of 
the class's leading social lights, bnt 
rather adds to the glory of his achieve- 
ments in that line. His trips to the be- 
loved and much visited institution in the 
Fenway were not infrequent, and upon 
many delightful occasions both there and at the Heights he was 
a i)leasing usher. His smile and pleasant ways made him a friend 
of every member of the class ; his was a disposition that could not 
be ruffled. He did his bit for the class by his faithful service as a 
member of the senior dance committee ; the class is not liable to 
forget the work of that committee. Need Ave say any more of 
Jerry than that he was a conscientious and hard working class- 
mate, a faithful friend and truly popular. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



FRANCIS M. NOLAN 

Canibi-idjje 

Sodality (1, 2) ; Class Basfball (1, 2) ; 
(ilee Club (], 2. 3). 

Frank — thus Ave knew him when he 
was Avith us — was like many others of 
our chxss, quiet, diligent, studious and 
prompt. These terms might Avell be 
applied in their greatest significance to 
our friend Frank; there Avas no other 
member of the class so diligent in class 
work, no other member so punctual in 
his arriA'als at class, no other member 
so faithful in his attendance as the young man Avhosc photo adorns 
this page. But eA'en more noticeable than the foregoing attributes 
was his deA'otion to the theories and practices of our noted Senior 
llifle Team. So keen Avas his pursuit of knoAvledge that during 
our Psychology hours Frank was often seen discussing the subject 
"in hand" with his brother members of the rifle team. We aa^oiiIcI 
not 1)6 surprised if his practice in gunnery stood him in good stead, 
j^f\ for he Avas called to the colors early. 





99 



1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




DAXIEL F. O'CONNOR 

Soutli Boston 

"Dan" 

('■d\< Miul (idwii Comniittee (4) : Class Treasurer (1) ; 
.\rar(|nette (1. 2) ; Fulton (3, 4). 

Dan was a mau who carried uutch 
weight with him whei'ever he went ; 
even in Freshman we bestowed upon 
Dan a jjosition of great resi)onsibilitY 
and trust, that of treasurer and cus- 
todian of our linances. We all know 
that Dan never allowed himself to lose 
any sleep over the amount of the finan- 
ces ill his hands. He was one of the founders of our famous South 
Boston club, and when that is added to the fact that Mn Murray 
and he more than once proved themselves successful promoters 
of social affairs we can readily understand why it is that he Avas 
socially prominent. Dan added another star to Boston College's 
service flag when he enlisted in the navy as a yeoman. Judging 
from the quality of his work at B. C, we 
do not hesitate to predict for him every 
success. 




1918 



SUB TU RR I 



1918 



MICHAEL L. O'CONNOE 

Wobnni 

"i/iA-c" 

Science Club (8) ; Fulton (3, 4) ; Sodiility (1, 2. 3. 4) : 
Class Biiseliall i2). 

Mike made studying liis one bis; 
object upon liis arrival at the college, 
and we can say that he certainly at- 
tained that most noteworthy object. 
The marks that he received and the 
prizes that he won must be satisfying 
to our quiet brother member from Wo- 
burn. From our very first days he has 
ranked as one of the leaders of the class in academic lines. Mike 
was rarely beaten in the battle for the class's supreme academic 
honors. On the occasions when victory was not his he was always 
to be reckoned upon to the very last as a dangerous competitor. 
WTiat moi'e need be said as a tribute to Mike than that he was a 
good scholar, a hard worker and a true friend? 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




GEOEGE F. ODEXTS^ALD 

Cambridge 

"The Pol" 

riiltciu (4) : Francis Tlionipstin Acadeniy (4) ; Science 
Club (4t : Tin ('oiinuittee (4). 

On this page we present the premier 
essayist of the class, the much mooted 
politician of the University City. Every- 
thing about George was generous ; as a 
result, his essays attracted miich notice 
among his classmates, his political 
moves even greater notice. He can fore- 
cast the political situation for the next 
twenty -five years, and we feel that his forecast will be verified as 
he has always made a study of the political situation. He has been 
a much sought after man during our senior year as a result of 
this telling power. 

It is rumored that George is to be made a field marshal in the 
University City's Student Army Training Corps. Whether in 
military or in civil life he will be the same power for right that 
the class always found him ; he will be the same genial, energetic 
and resjjected man that he was of old. 




K 



1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JOHN M. O'LOUGHLIN 

Maiden 
''Silk" 

"It is a vote" 

Class President (2, 3); Marquette (2): Fulton (3); 
Sodality (1. 2, 3). 

John's eleotiou to the ])residencv of 
the chiss for Junior will ahvays be an 
event long remembered by his fellow 
classmates. One reason was that it was 
an unprecedented happening that a man 
be elected to the class i)residencv for 
two years running. John conformed to 
our idea of a dignified president; all 
will agree to this. As a worker he was what the fellows call a 
"doer" ; we all recall how he alone did eA'erything. Under him the 
class was known as the "live wire" of the college. 

For us to add more in praise would be superfluous ; however, 
we must mention the fact that John's patriotic ardor was more 
potent than the ties of friendship. John enlisted in the navy as 
a yeoman, where he did yeoman service. The dignity character- 
istic of him diiring our college days will stand John in good stead 
in the position of honor that is sure to 
be his. 





1918 



SUB TURRI 



1918 




PATRICK J. O'MALLEY 

Maiden 

"Pat" 

"^YeU, I tell you" 
Sodnlity (1. 2) : Fulton (3, 4) ; Class Baseball (1. 2). 

At every class meeting Pat was gen- 
erally tlie object of marked attention; 
he had a striking way about his eA'ei'y 
action which compelled instant recog- 
nition from his fellow classmates. One 
might almost have likened him to a 
generous host, offering to his guests a 
bountiful repast; true, the nature of 
Pat's refreshments were generally of a 
dubious nature, but they succeeded in bringing the donor into the 
limelight. Our artist in his wonderful way has portrayed at the 
bottom of this page Pat "making a bid to break into society." To 
tell the truth, we must say that Pat never broke through : society 
alwaj's resisted his efforts. 

Outside of his intense class activity Pat is remembered for his 
Avinning personality ; he claims the friendshij) of no less a celebrity 
than Field Marshal Odenwald, the class's only general. As we 
know this to be a fact we feel sure 
that Pat lacks no friends on his jour- 
nev to success. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



THOMAS A. PHELAjS^ 

Jamaica Plain 

"The Chairman'' 

Marquette (2): Fulton (4(: Class I'.aseball (1); 

Class Football (]) ; Passion I'lay (2. 3); Fic- 

tni-e Committee (4) ; Dance Committee (4). 

V\) to the time when Tom left school 
to join the country's tightiug forces he 
had made a name for himself; he had 
served as president of one of our prom- 
inent Boston College clubs, presiding 
over the destinies of the Jamaica Plain 
organization. As chairman of our pic- 
ture committee he concluded arrange- 
ments which thoroughl.y satisfied the class and assured it of good 
results. As a member of the Fulton Del)ating Society he had 
shown himself loyal and true and a callable speaker. As an ath- 
lete he had added to our class honors. 

Owing to the fact that he has been for some time in the active 
fighting zone overseas we have heard but little from Tom; his 
past record is a guarantee that wherever Tom goes 
honor will be done his class and his college. 





1918 



SUB TU R R I 



1918 




CLAEENCE H. PIIvE 

Wintlirop 

-Red" 

Marquette (1, 2); Glee Club (3): Sub TtiREi (4); 
.Science Club (4); Passion Pljiy (2). 

You probably do not know that Clar- 
ence liad anything to do with gunmen ; 
well, he himself didn't know that for 
one whole year he had been sitting be- 
hind one until the aforesaid member 
of the Polish secret police dropped a 
A'icious-looking weapon at Clarence's 
feet. Rumor has it that Clarence was startled ; we would j^robably 
have experienced the same sensations had we been in a similar 
])light. Clarence was nothing if not popular; his eloquent and 
forceful speeches in class, the readiness that he manifested upon 
every possible occasion to do even the slightest service, his genial 
and cheery disi)osition — these the class will find hard to forget. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



THOMAS F. PYNE 

Lowell 

"We should ixit hitvc it on the outiiif/" 

Sddiility Ci. 4); Treasurer Sddnlity (4): 
Science Club (.4). 

Tom is another acquisition from 
Holy Cross, and like Ms fellow colle- 
gians from our sister institution, lie has 
shown himself to be a thoroughly like- 
able and capable fellow. His keen phil 
osoj^hical mind has more than once been 
the object of our admiration during 
discussions with our learned jDrof essors. 
His social i)rominence is vouched for by 
the fact that he was chosen to lead the destinies of one of our most 
flourishing Boston College clubs, that of his city. Under his 
organization this club has arranged many a social success, and 
Ave have been informed that Tom's dignity and energy have con- 
tributed largely to the success of these occasions. Always show- 
ing himself a faithful member of Avhatever organization to which 
he belonged, a thorough student and a tmly capal)le fellow, Tom 
carries with him the goodwill of 1918. 





107 



1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




FEANCIS C. EAMISCH 

Dorchester 

''Babe" 

"TnJkiiHi (thi)ut soiiiftliiiif/ nice — Oh, hoij!" 

Sodality (1, 2, 3, 4) ; Varsity Basketball (3) ; Science 

Club (4) ; Stjb Ttjrei (4) ; Class Football (3, 4) ; 

Class Baseball (1, 2) ; Class Hockey (4). 

Somewliere iu this volume joii will 
see a picture entitled "Babe saves the 
day." That picture shows Babe trans- 
ferring the rights and i^roperty of the 
"Famous Thirty" to the good ship "J.I." 
That was only another waj^ by which he 
strengthened the hold which he had 
upon our affections. He was one of those fellows of whom you 
say, "Quiet, but oh my." Manj^ a morning we have heard him 
say, "Talk about something nice — oh, boy." His manj^ and arduous 
social duties did not prevent him from being a tower of strength 
on our basketball team. Babe weighed only about 200 pounds, 
and believe us, he cut some swath carrying the ball up the floor. 

Thus you see that Babe leaves behind a fine reputation, the 
result of his friendly goodwill to please every- 
one. Our pleasant associations with him will 
never be forgotten, for his cheery and pleasant 
disposition could not but impress itself upon 
our class. 




1918 



SUB T U RR 1 



1918 




THOMAS A. EEYNOLDS 

Jamaica Plaiu 

''Tom'' 

"Up, mile Fhochc, far ilic irorks" 

Kxecutive Committee (4) ; Class Baseliall (1, i) ; Class 

Hockey (3, 4); Sodality (1, 2. 3, 4) ; Glee 

Club (1, 2) ; Commencement Speaker (4). 

From his Fi-eslimau year, when he 
lieaded 1918, \\p to Senior, when he 
acted as leader of the Bolsheviki, "Eed" 
has ever been prominent in class. As a 
wing on oiir 1918 hockey team he con- 
tribnted largely to our victories ; as 
leader of the Proletariat he added to his 
fame ; yet as president of the Senior gun club we knew and admired 
him even more. Most of all we remember his wit. He contributed 
much to the enjoyment of that West Point trip, for be it said that 
Tom could enliven any occasion, and no gathering was ever dead 
when he was around. Activity Avas his middle name ; he was ever 
in the thick of everything, yet he always found time to do a favor 
for a friend. One of his most noted activities was Notre Dame 
where, with many othei-s we might mention, Tom ushered on any 
and every possible occasion. They came, 
they saw, and they were conquered. Every 
member of the class hopes that gradua 
tion will not mean the parting Of the ways 
for them and Tom, for they certainly 
would miss his ever sunny disposition, his 
ready Avit, and the encouragement of his 
IJi'esence. But Avherever they go they 
knoAv that they can count upon "Red" as 
a friend. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




CHARLES E. RILEY 

Boston 

"Cliarlie" 

'■ U'/io'.v f/ot tlicm?" 

Class Basehall (1) : Class Football (3, 4) ; Marquette 
(1. 12): Glee Club (3); Jlauager Varsity Track 
|4) ; Dance Committee (4) : Athletic Council (4). 

A genial classmate was Charlie, in 
the eyes of his class ; a genial and wel- 
coming host was he, for with pride and 
joy he daily showed to a certain selected 
few visitors at our athletic office the 
trophies and pictures contained therein, 
Plis kindly and generous nature found 
rest in the companionship of his fellow 
members of the famous (Inn Club; the recollection of the days 
spent with those kindly souls will ever bring joy and inspiration 
to Charlie. As manager of the varsity track team he performed 
in a most satisfactory manner the duties of a most arduous posi- 
tion ; we suffered not one blemish on our track schedule during 
his regime. We can wish nothing greater for him than that his 
record in the future maintain the same standard of success which 
liis work with us shows. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



GEORGE F. RITTER 

]S'citick 

Fulton (4) : .Sotlulity (1, 2, 3, 4). 

Witliin our memory no Bostou Col- 
lege class has ever been without its 
representative from Natick, and Ave are 
glad to say that the graduation day of 
1918 saw this precedent unbroken. We 
are glad to say that George has added 
to the long list of achievement of Xatick 
men. From our dim Freshman days we 
And it easy to recall the spirit of earn- 
estness that George manifested in our 
efforts to prove to our older brothers of B. C. that we were a class 
that could be counted upon. From that time through the quickly 
slipping months George proved himself a cheerful and willing 
worker and a ready helper in those undertakings which Avere for 
the greater glory of his Alma Mater. The extent of his efforts in 
behalf of this book has been recognized and appreciated by the 
members of the staff". Mav success be his. 





1918 



SUB TU RR I 



1918 




JOHN J. ROMAN 

Brockton 

"The Gunman" 
••/ /(■/// Ndji a fcic icords on fhc tmhject" 
I'assion Tlay ci, 3) : Secretary Fulton (4). 

This page is devoted to tlie doings of 
one of our most prominent actors, wlio 
was well ill the foregrouiid of our Pas- 
sion Play. Dramatic followers will 
always remember how John used to 
speak that line beginning "A prize well 
won." John's jjowerful physique was 
revealed to us by his garb of 2000 years 
ago. His speeches in the Fulton also brought him much attention, 
and we cannot here describe the keen pleasure and intense interest 
with which his brother members of the Fulton listened to him. 
He did not confine his speaking activity to the Fulton, however ; 
he was knoAvn to the outside world as a lecturer of renowoi, his 
theme dealing with the fallacies of socialism. Other reasons for 
his success were his third eyebrow, the much-handled typewriter, 
his ministerial tie, and his very terrifying ^^^ 
fire-arm. Thus you see that the reasons for 
his fame were many ; many more, we feel sure, 
will come in the vears to come. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



JAMES I. ROONEY 

Brooklijie 

"Jim" 
''Does the gcntl<^man insinuate anythiiigf" 

A'arsity Football (1, 2) ; Secretary Class (4) ; Sub 

TuRRi (4) ; Sodality (1, 2, 3, 4) : Science Club 

(3, 4) ; Radio Club Vice-rresident (4) ; 

Fulton (3) ; Manager Class Hockey 

(4) ; Manager Class Football (4) ; 

Class Baseball (1, 2, 3). 

When the class Avished auythiug well 
clone in the athletic line it naturally 
turned towards Jim; witness the man- 
agerial positions of our senior football 
and hockey teams — something unjjre- 
cedented — that the class intrusted to 
Jim. Witness his election to the secretaryship of senior : witness 
his election to the vice-presidency of the Radio Club. Witness the 
fact that his friends were legion. Jim's wit and forensic ability 
were demonstrated on many occasions, but on none so forcibly as 
during the altercation with the gentleman from Wakefield. Jim 
found a foeman worthy of his steel on that occasion ; anyway, 
Jim's reports were witty, to the point and the cause of much 
merriment. 

Jim's yeoman work on the varsity football team 
won for him the plaudits of the spectators ; his yeo- 
man work in the service of the class won for him the 
lasting esteem and affection of all the fellows. He 
was a fellow whom everybody liked. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




PAUL X. A. EOONEY 

East Boston 

••\]'Iial.' tliou too sleepless, hutrack?" 

Miu-quette (1. 2): Fnltou (o) ; Passion I'ltiy (2); 
StjiJiiH (3) : Science Club (3). 

Paul occupied a very diplomatic 
position in our midst, acting as inter- 
mediary between a starving host and 
the food that would satisfy them. His 
title should have been Secretary of the 
Interior. His was no job for a pacifist, 
but it was good training for the first 
man in the class to win a commission in the balloon service of the 
army. Paul is now across with the Expeditionary Forces as a 
balloon pilot. According to the latest reports from the front, he 
has made good with a vengeance ; that is only what Ave had ex- 
pected of him. 

Paul was known as one of the conservatives of the class, both 
in his ideas and in the expression of those ideas, and again in his 
attitude toAvards those in authority. This 
Avas best manifested in the conscientious 
fulfilment of his duties as beadle. But 
the Avelcome that the class gaA^e him upon 
his recent A'isit should assure him of the 
esteem Avith Avhich he is regarded by eA^ery 
riember. 




1918 



SUB TU RR I 



1918 



JOHN E. EYAN 

Xewtoii Ceiitei- 



Marquette (1, 2) ; Fultou (3) ; Glee Club 
Sodality (1, 2). 



(1, 2, 3) : 




As we recall John at this writing — 
and it is more than a year since he has 
been with the assembled class — we can- 
not help bnt remember that he was one 
of those Xewtonites whose presence 
made for action, especially at the meet- 
ings of the debating societies. We re- 
call more than one forcefnl speech de- 
liA'ered l)y John in the days of the Mar- 
qnette Debating Society ; then it was that we first learned of his 
powers as an orator. Like his colleagues from Newton — and of 
these our class numbered "Jasper" Clear, "Jake" Frazier, Ed 
Heislein and Jim Crowdle — he found joy in the forensic contest 
where "keen wit matched keen wit," and other things were 
matched. 

The time will soon come Avhen the class will be reunited ; then 
will we extend to John a more concrete expres- 
sion of the goodwill which the Class of 1918 now 
takes this occasion to manifest. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




JOHN C. SARGENT 

Lowdl 

"I'll he (loirii ill the Lab" 

Footliiill (L'. 3) : Class Football (1, 2) : Class Baseball 

(1. 2, 4) : Science Club (3. 4) ; Radio Club 

(4) : Sodality (1. 2, 3, 4). 

Chemist, member of tlie Science and 
Kaclio Clubs, traveler on the B. »& M., 
Jack enjoyed many diversions during 
his college days. His work in the chem- 
ical laboratory was of such a caliber as 
to admit him to that austere and ex- 
clusive body of scientists, the Boston 
College Science Club, and won for him 
a place on the more or less defeated 
team known to the Lawyers as the ''Atoms." Not content with 
the foregoing. Jack occasionally attended a meeting of the Radio 
Club. Again it is to his distinction that he survived the arduous 
trijDs from Lowell to Boston. Due mention must be here made of 
the fact that he was vice-president of the Lowell B. C. Club. His 
qualities as manifested by his activities in college and especially 
by his siiccess in the technical curriculum of the college, lead lis 
to predict for him a bright technical career. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




EEMI B. SCHUVEE 

Dorcliester 

"Remniy^' 

"Yin is xoiiir ho//, hrlicve me" 

Orchestra (1. 2. 3. 4) : (ilee Club (1. 2. 3, 4) : Smlalitx- 

(1. 2, 3, 41 : Marquette {2) : Cap and 

(iown Coniniittee (41. 

Have you ever gone to a Boston 
College smoker or Home Xight or de- 
bate? Of course you have. Then you 
must liave seen that tall, slim, nice- 
looking chap walk up to the piano, have 
heard him sing, and then seen him very 
modestly retire into the background. 
That was "Remmy." As a singer, he always made a decided hit; 
but as an obliging classmate, he was better known. Remi never 
had to be asked twice ; anything that he could do was always done 
most willingly; that is why he has been pronounced one of the 
class's most likeable and best dispositioned fellows. 

Music seems to have been his forte, for in addition to being a 
,. member of the college orchestra from his fresh- 
man year, Remi has on many occasions acted 
as soloist for the Glee Club and Critique Club; 
those who have heard his singing have jjraised 
it highly. 

But aside from the music part of it all, 
Remi will be regarded by all as another of 
B. C.'s good felloAvs, a willing and a pleasing 
entertainer, as everybody's friend. 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




CHARLES T. SEXTON 

Milford 
"Cliawles" 

"/ foiH/nitiildtc fJic class" 

AdvertisiiiK Manage'' ^^^b Turiu (4) ; Class Hockey 
(4» : Sodality (3, 4). 

Charlie is anotlier one of those chaps 
who admit that they have been wrong- 
on various occasions; Charlie acknowl- 
edged the error of his ways by changing 
from Holy Cross to Boston College for 
his junior and senior years. He derived 
some advantages from his stay at the 
Cross, but the finishing touches were applied at old B. C. More 
than once Charlie held the boys spellbound by his exhortations and 
explanations during class meetings ; his greatest coup was the 
recitation which he delivered before a certain distinguished and 
well loved visitor. We almost got a half holiday for it. 

In his 0'\^al line Charlie was one of the class's best artists. 
When Charlie spoke the world sat up and listened, for his serious 
manner conveyed many promises. Maybe politics is his game. But 
whatever vocation he may folloAv in after life, Charlie will climb 
the ladder to success, and on his climb will be accompanied by the 
heartiest well-wishes of his class- 
mates. .^ 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




JOHX J. SHEA 

Xorth Cambridge 

"Jaivn" 

"Aiiijtliiiif/ I can (If) to help, let iiic knoir" 

Varsity Footliall (3. 4): Marquette (1, 2); Fultou 

(3, 4); Vice-President Fulton (4); Glee Club 

(1. 2, 3, 4) : Executive Committee (4) : Sub 

Ttjrbi (4); Stylus (4); Sodality (1, 2, 

3, 4) ; Class Baseball (1) ; Radio Clul) (41. 

"B. C.'sball. First down. One yard 
to go." B. C. stands Avere stilled and 
hushed; the fear of an impending dis- 
aster was not entirelj' absent from our 
hearts, for Oliphant, the country's 
mightiest back, stood ready to pierce 
the B. C. line. Then was written a most 
gloi-ious page in B. C. history, for West Point's might was hurled 
back four times. It was the center of the line that Avas tried ; it 
was the center of the line that proved true. To Jack Shea is due 
most of the credit; his play on this occasion was the crowning- 
glory of a wonderful season at center. Absolutely Avithout fear, 
aggressive to the extreme, a proved tower of strength, he offered 
himself as a buhvark against opposition. 

Off' the playing field the same was ever true. There are none 
of the class Avho will not pay testimony to the broadness of his 
mind and the courage he had in his ideals, and what a friend 
he was. 

Whetlier in jieace or in war Jack Avill never flinch from any 
task set before him; his above record 
proves his ability to do things; the en- 
tire Class of 1918 will prove to the 
world his abilitv to make friends. 




1918 



SUB T U RRI 



1918 



PHILIP D. SHEA 

Wobui-u 

\'arsit.v Baseball (1. 2) -. Glee Club (1. 2) ; 
Sodality (1. 2. 3.) 

Phil has the proud distinction of 
having been the tirst Boston College 
undergraduate to see France as a mem- 
ber of Uncle Sam's forces. He enlisted 
in the HeaA^y Artillery, went across with 
one of the first contingents of American 
troops, and won his commission from 
an otticers' school over there as a result 
» of his work. The news of Phil's success 
was no surprise to the Class of 1918, for they kneAV that Phil had 
the attributes that make for success. They had known him on the 
ballfield as an aggressive, game, thoroughly sportsmanlike player, 
who never kneAV what it was to quit; in class they had seen him 
apply himself to his studies with the same diligence and earnest- 
ness that had characterized his other actions. As a fellow class- 
mate they knew him as an interested and tireless worker for the 
class's honor. They know that his 
work over there in France will bring 
for him the same honor in the eyes of 
the world that his work here brought 
him in the eves of his classmates. 





320 



1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




THOMAS F. SHEERAX 

Hyde I'.uk 

''Torn'' 

"Did ijou .vet' irhich iraij Forrester weiitr' 

Class Treiisurer (4): Science Club (3. 4); Secretary 

Science Club (4) : Class Baseball (1, 2) ; Sodality 

(1.2,3,41 : Dance Committee (4) : Fulton (41. 

This is the grand custodian of the 
senior cash. Tom acquitted himself 
nobly in the thankless and none too 
pleasant task of senior treasurer, man- 
aging our finances well and preventing 
the class from getting too daring in the 
matter of expenditures. It will not be 
hard to recall Tom, as he appeared dur- 
ing every class meeting with that old 
corncob of his going full blast and making some one of the three 
speeches we inevitably got during the class meeting. Sometimes 
it would start this way : "There are some men in this class who" 
or sometimes "You can't do it, Mr. Chairman" or "I want the class 
to distinctly understand." 

Tom hails from Hyde Park, but devotes quite a little of his 
time to Woburn, Wiuthrop and Roxbury. With Joe Forrester he 
was usually to be seen ; Damon and Pythias had nothing "on this 
pair." Like his pal, Tom was universally 
liked, respected as a very hard working stu- 
dent, admired as one who counts no sacrifice 
too great that will benefit a friend. He de- 
serves the best that can be said of him in 







1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




EDWAED C. SMITH 

Abiiigtou 

-Ed" 

Sddtility (1. 2. :J. 4) : Science Club (1. 2, 3, 4) : 
I'assioii Play (2, 3) ; Class Baseball (1. 2). 

Ed is one of our many classmates 
who made a real sacrifice of their time 
in attending college ; when Ed traveled 
day in and day out from Abington to 
the college and from the college back to 
Abington, he certainly showed us the 
stuff of which he was made. It was in- 
deed a real sacrifice to do it for four 
years. But sacrifice seemed to be the keynote of Ed's every action ; 
though in all fairness to himself he could have departed for his 
home immediately after the day's session, he Avas not content 
with so doing. His ambition to get the most out of his opportu- 
}iities caused him to join with the "Molecules" after school hours 
and work in the "Lab" until the rays of the setting sun reminded 
him that it was imperative that he wend his way homeward. We 
can and do assure our readers that we have 
no fears for Ed's success ; his habits of life as 
known to us assure him of making his mark 
in his chosen profession. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



EDWARD M. SULLIVAX 

Doi'cliPster 

"The Duke'' 

"Xoir, men, irc'vr got to put it across: hig" 

Maniuette (1, 2) ; Muniuette Prize Debate (2) ; Fulton 

(3, 4) ; Alternate Fulton Intercollegiate (3) ; 

Fulton Lecture Band (4) ; Dramatics (1. 2) ; 

Class Treasurer (3) ; Class I'resideut (4). 

From the time wlien lie made his 
first appearance for Boston College in 
'•Hamlet" until the time when he was 
called into the service of the United 
States Navj' — and he Avas then well 
along in his senior year — the Duke 
proved himself one of the class's busiest 
and most energetic members. The parts 
that he played in Shakespearean dramatics marked Ed as a foot- 
light star. His eloquent discourses in the Marquette and Fulton 
Societies showed us a marked brilliancy. As a charter member of 
the famous "OutlaAvs," the Criticians, he shared in its trials and 
its successes. No more conclusive evidence of his popularity can 
be offered than that he was chosen by his classmates treasurer for 
junior and president for senior. 

Leaving behind him a record of which he 
'^\7// fiff^ niay be justly proud, Ed will be long remeljii- 

bered hj his classmates as a brilliant public 
speaker, a tireless worker, and as one who 
will stick by his friends to the absolute 
limit. 





1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




JOSEPH C. SULLIVAI^ 

Cambridge 
'Voe" 

Class Football (1, 2) ; Class Baseball (1, 4) ; 
Sodality (1, 2. 4). 

Xot a little of our freshman football 
supremacy was due to tlie prowess of 
our sturdy classmate from Cambridge. 
It would seem strange to us if we did 
not know of Joe's very studious habits, 
that the skill which was so often dis 
played in interclass athletics did not 
tempt Joe to try for yarsity honors. 
For, desi^ite his athletic tendencies, Joe 
considered it his first duty to become a good student, and rightly, 
too. Thus it w^as that he could deyote time to interclass athletics 
only. In that respect, that of devotion to studies, Joe was typical 
of the Class of 1918. 

The determination and perseverance that characterized Joe's 
every work at Boston College will insure for him success in the 
outside world. 




=J«_ 



1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



LEWIS G. SULLIVAN 

Marblelieail 

"Louie" 

Sodality (4) ; Varsity Baseliall il. IM ; 
Science Club (4). 

The most genial host that the Glee 
Club and the Critique Club found in 
Marblehead on their most memorable 
visits to that town — for further details 
see any Boston College man — was our 
own classmate Louie. Those are some 
of the many times Avhen Louie showed 
himself to be the good fellow that we 
have ahvays known him to be. In class affairs he was most active ; 
on the baseball field his rei)utation was surpassed by few members 
of the class. As a student lie found chemistry his forte, so much 
so that he was numbered among the members of that most ex- 
clusive and revered body of men, the Boston College Science Club. 

In view of the record that he made we can say that Louie 
showed himself the kind of a fellow that any class would gladly 
include among its members. 





1918 



SUB T U RRI 



1918 




WARREN J. SWEAT 

Dorchester 

"77;r Man of Mystery" 

"I'll let !i<)H kiioir soon all ahoiit it" 
Soaality (1, 2. 3, 4) : Clasn Baseliall (4). 

A member of our class once called 
Warreu a man of mystery for, as this 
fellow said, Warren seems to know 
everything- and everybody, especially 
those whom .you least expect him to 
know. This is by no means to his dis- 
credit, but rather it is evidence of his 
wide range of acquaintances and knowl- 
edge. Let us say right now that he had the respect and admiration 
of every member of the class who knew him as a man who would 
make big sacrifices and jjersevere diligently in order to see the 
fulfilment of an ambition. The absence of prominent activities 
in his record above would seem to indicate that he took no active 
part in our college activities ; his whole-hearted support of Avhat- 
ever the class undertook, however, and the gratifying results 
which he attained in his studies was proof enough that it was for 
lack of time rather than for lack of 
loyalty that he did not seek prominence. 
What more need we say than that he 
was respected by all the members of the 
class? 







1918 



SUB T U RRI 



1918 



JAMES F. VAUGHAN 

South Boston 

"'Siviss Research-' 

"Another c.riimviciit done" 

Marquette (1, 2) ; Sergeant-at-Arms i'l) : 
Baseball (1. 2, 3). 

Jim was one of the first of our class- 
mates to be called to the colors ; his was 
another face missing from our ranks 
(luring our senior year. He was one 
of those fortunate chajjs whose proud 
boast it can be that they were members 
of the A. E. F. 

But since this book is a narration ol 
our doings at the Heights, we will come 
back to -Jim as we knew him. That he was a good athlete was 
proved by the fact that he participated in varsity baseball frays 
even in our freshman days. In the matter of scholarship his note- 
worthy diligence in the chemical laboratory earned for him the 
title of "The Swiss Research ]\Ian" — a title conferred upon him 
by his admiring classmates. His popularity was attested to by 
the fact that despite his obvious reluctance Jim was elected to 
the imj^ortant and responsible post of 
\\ ^ sergeant-at-arms by the unanimous vote 

of the Marquette Debating Society. His 
record speaks for itself. 





1918 



SUB TU RR I 



1918 




JOSEPH E. WALSH 

Roxbury 

"Joe'' 

.Manniette {2\ : Fultou (4) : Sodality (1, 2. 3, 4). 

It is with real pleasure that we in- 
trochioe to you oue of the class's well 
known prodigies. Joe is one of those 
chaps who like study for study's sake 
and for the pleasure that intellectual 
combats afford. Of course you who 
know the class will not marvel unduly 
at Joe's proclivities along this line of 
endeavor ; you must know that taken as 
a unit the Class of 1018 is without a peer in the field of mental 
activity. Honesty, however, compels us to give praise where 
praise is due; for that reason we dwell somewhat at length on 
Joe's talents. Whenever a difficult thesis was to be defended in 
scholarly manner, whenever learned explanations were the order 
of the day, Joe was the man who invariably 
tilled the breach. His intellectual successes 
in the past lead us to predict for Joe a high 
measure of success in his chosen profession. 




1918 



SUB T U RRI 



1918 



THOMAS J. WALSH 

Salem 

"*S'o7r»( B. C. Ciuh" 

Scidnlity d. 2. :!. 4i; Class Uascl.nll (1. 4): Class 

Footliall (1. 4) : I'assiui) Play ('2) : Itailiu Cluli 

(4) : Fulton Iieliatliii; Society (4). 

This page will tell of the doings of 
one of the most prominent, most flour- 
ishing, and most powerful financially of 
all the Boston College clubs. It was no 
fault of Tom's that his noted organiza- 
tion did not conduct a dance for the 
benefit of what our president called 
"the class's greatest project." Lack of 
time alone preA^ented us from having the pleasure of being present 
at what we feel sure would have been a most enjoyable occasion. 
Tom had a style distinctly his own; his classmates feel that much 
of his prominence in later life Avill be due to this peculiar trait 
which has characterized his every action in the past. As his class- 
mates Ave can vouch for the host of friends made during Tom's 
college days; Ave stand ready to vouch for the success and fame 
that Avill be his in the davs to come. 




3>p>ffcfS 




1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 




FEANCIS J. WHELAN 

, Dorcliester 
''Fan HI/" 

"Pence, I coiiiiiiaiKl ijoii" 

SliiiUespeurean Dramatics (1. 2) ; I'asision Play (2, 3) ; 

Jlai-quette (1, 2) ; Fulton (3) : Oratorical 

Contest (3) : Baseball (2. 3). 

From his freslimaii year to the time 
that he was "elected to serve the coun- 
try in a military capacity," Frank has 
been the class's leading exponent of the 
dramatic art. In "Hamlet" as the sec- 
ond grave-digger he was a sensation ; 
the next year he showed his versatility 
by playing a remarkable "Henry" in 
•'Richard III." The portrayal of the character "Pilate" in the 
"Passion Play" earned for him a reputation which will last for 
some time to come. Aside from his acting, his facial control was 
wonderful, and to see that left arm of his go uj) had a very sooth- 
ing effect on the mob. In our junior year Frank was the beadle 
of his section of our class as far as the midyear ; at this time both 
Dan Ilarkins and he lost their jobs, since their memories were 
not up to par and they had too many friends. 



A flue -fellow, clever speaker, a friend on 
whom one can always count, he will prove to 
the outside world to possess the punch and 
abilitv we have alwavs known him to have. 




1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 




- AKTHUR A. WHOLLEY 

Korbiiry 

"I'd he fjhtd to do it" 

A'arsity Itasebull (I, li, 3) ; Student Athletic Council 

(2. 3) : Class Football (2, 3)-; Fulton (3) ; 

Kxecutive Coimuittee (4). 

Ever since that clay when he first set 
foot within the portals of Alma Mater, 
Art built lip a great name for himself as 
an athlete. He did not neglect his 
studies, however; this fact was attest- 
ed to by his graduation from an officers' 
training camp with the rank of lieuten- 
ant, and this in a very short time after 
his joining the service. But — to come back to his athletics — Art 
was a regular on the baseball teams while he was with lis; his 
fielding was ever superb, but his brilliant playing against the 
Boston Red Sox some two years back surpassed even his usual 
stellar work. On that occasion his thrilling catches and marvel- 
ous thi'ows were such as to merit many words of praise from the 
usually conservative Boston scribes. As a member of that note- 
worthy sextet of Donnelly, Fitzger- 
ald, Gildea, Maloney, Murray and 
Wholley, Art was well known, but 
some day he will be even better kno\ATa 
to the outside world as a successful 
man, and even more as a very stead- 
fast and dependable friend. 




1918 S U B T U RR I 1918 



iH\m BprofB 



Stephen E. Fitzgerald. Lieutenant attacked to tlie Machine 
Gun Comiaany of the IGth Keguhir Infantry, was killed 
in action on May 7, 1!)18, wkile leading- a dayligkt raid on 
tke enemy trenckes. 

Charles A. Maduex, Seaman in tke United States Navy, 
died in tke service at tke Ckelsea Xaval Hospital, Feb- 
ruary IL', 1!)18. 

Eev. Richard J. O'Buiex. S.J., Lieutenaut-Ckaplain of tke 
5tk Marines, served kis (lod and country well on tke bat- 
tlefields of France. 




LIKUT. STEPHEN E. PITZ(iEl{ALI) 

Killed In action May 7, 1018. 




(TIAKLKS A. :\rAnT)KX 

Died in the Xaval .Service, February 1:.', l!)ls, at the Chelsea Xaval Hospital. 




KE\'. KiniAKI) J. (VBKIEN, S.J. 
Lieutenant Cluiiiliiin, Fifth Marines 



9 








rr-a 


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1 


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II 



1918 



SUB T U R R I 



1918 



iFootball 

No Boston College football team ever made a better rec- 
ord than tlie team of tlie season of nineteen seventeen, led by 
onr ovm popular classmate, Charlie Fitzgerald. Coach Char- 
lie Brickley and Trainer Bob Fowler kept xip their good work 
of the previous year by turning oiit a team most worthy of the 
Maroon and (xold. It is its proud boast that it met defeat at 
the hands of only two opponents, and neither defeat was truly 
decisive. It won the second leg on the Cardinal O'Connell 
C\\\^ by thoroughly defeating our a:icient rival of the Purjile 
to the tune of thirty-four to six. It had the i)roud satisfac- 
tion of making West Point extend itself to the limit to secure 
victory, holding even the mighty Oliphant for doAvus on 
Boston's one-vard line. 



Its record : 




Boston College 


L'(i 


Boston College 


40 


Boston College 


liO 


Boston College 


•) 


Boston College 


48 


Boston College 


:U 


Boston College 


01 


Boston College 


7 



Norwich Universi 


tv 





Boston Naval 


Keser 


yes 


Tufts 









Brown 






7 


Rhode Island 


St: 


ite 





Holy Cross 






(] 


Middlebnrv 






G 


West Point 






13 



139 



1918 



SUB T U RR I 



1918 



The season's record iu baseball was a most fitting climax 
for a most successful year in Boston College atliletics. Losing 
three game soiit of a total of sixteen jjlayed, rolling np a score 
of 103 i^oints against the thirty-five of its opponents, the team, 
coached and captained by our OAvn "Beef" Gildea, made a very 
creditable record. It attained the goal for which Boston 
College had been striving through many long years, a baseball 
victory over Holy Cross. The record it presents must be 
viewed all the more favorably when one considers that the 
team was without the services of a professional coach. 



The record : 








Boston ("olle.nc 


i; 


West Point 


•) 


Boston Collejje 


11 


Brown 





Boston Collejix^ 


4 


Xe\\]iort Naval T. S. 


4 


Boston College 


4 


Harvard Radio 


'2 


Boston Collefte 


Ki 


Fisk Bed Toi)s 





Boston College 


7 


Bates 





Boston College 


1 


Dartmontli 


(• 


Boston College 


4 


Holy Cross 


1 


Boston College 


2l! 


Boston Cniversity 


(i 


Boston College 


1 


St. Anselni 


2 


Boston College 


;j 


Dartmontli 


1 


Boston College 


:^ 


Holy Cross 


4 


Boston College 


4 


Williams 


■J 


Boston College 


4 


Tnfts 


'2 


Boston College 


9 


Syracuse 


2 


Boston College 


4 


Tufts 










^^ 


^^^^^ 


-1 




*■' >- ■ " 




' - 1 





Ait- 




■1^'^ 


^Hff 


'^H 




ll^ ^Ijb 


1 





^HP*^^; 










■ 



^^^^^r / Lt 


1^ ^v^^^lMIHHBHi^^ 


^^^^^^^'^ 


■ 




B^^^^,^^ 


yh 


^1 


nl^l 


^^^^H 


■ 


[^H 


1/ j-v ^^^^^H 


^^^^^^pi^H 


■ 


^^^1 


k1 '^^^^. 


^^ "^ i 1 


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jH 




He 




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S^M 


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1 






OtJ T«e vJaV ' 








OOEIX 








VJ\UU ^oJ ex/ei^ «^o.^(,eT i< 











TWC 6oLSriEV, K, (HC(V)t 





fa ftrtCRM AN^-.t^McEj -rri(\T iA£ vJ, uu RiT^p "Trie 



T«t. ID"<1<M t5f A cJtH.C 




Vin Murray's songs? 

Styx Cahill's salute to Pilate? 

The rosaiy? 

The piano-breaking episode? 

Father Corrigan lectures and Avhat followed? 

The trijDS to Xotre Dame? 

(Iroboski's motions? 

Tom Collins" speeches? 

Miiri^hy's blushes? 

Dry analysis? 

Elections for Senior? 

The Rifle Team's cross-country run? 

That trip to West Point? 

Holy Cross luck? 

Jim Rooney's reports? 

Charley Sexton's definitions? 

McCarthy's sketches? 

The outing and the Class's guests? 

The A. A. office after 1.15? 

The Bolsheyiki? 

Our Senior Soiree? 

When the Campers came back? 

The scraps between the Critique Club and the 

anti-criticiaus in the Fulton? 
The 3 to 1 victory oyer Haryard? 
Those poems in Freshman? 
\Vhen the cocoa Ayas spilt? 
Somebody's mustache? 
The mob? 
The parades downtown after the Holy Cross 

victories? 
Dancing 'n' every thin'? 



iFamouH ^aijinga of 3FamouH Mm 

Good morning, cliild of grace. 

Go see tlie Dean. 

Get out ; go home. 

I am out for blood, fellows. 

I wish that you fellows would stop that down there. 

If I haA'e flat feet for an ofl&cer I've got them for a private 

Xo, I didn't get my yellow slip but — 

Who's got them'? 

They "ain't" no money in ontology. 

You can't make shoe leather out of Cosmolog^^ 

Well, that's a pretty good one ; tell us another. 

Famous Songs 

'■She sat on the veranda" 

"Fish Haley's Horse" 

'' 'Twas Christmas on the Island" 

"He stood at the bar of justice" 

"Poor Holy Cross" 

"There was a little bird" 

Famous Mysteries 

The Bolsheviki Sixty 

The First Plattsburg Camp 

The Senior Soiree 

Famous Organizations 

The Critique 
The Campers Club 
The Bolsheviki 
The Ushers Club 



Compliments of the 

Boston College 
Alumni 



Compliments of 

Boston College 



Compliments of the 

Philomatheia Club 



Compliments of our 

Junior Class 



Compliments of the 

Sophomore Class 



Compliments of the 

Freshman Class 



LiOwell 
Boston College Club 



Somerville 
Boston College Club 



L,awrence 

Boston College 

Club 



South Boston 

Boston College 

Club 



Dorchester 



Boston College Club 



Compliments of 

Wm. F. Fitzgerald 



Compliments of 

Richard S. Teeling 



Compliments of the 

Alumnae Association 

of the Boston Academy 

of Notre Dame 



Compliments of 

James E. Hayes Council 
K. of C, Dorchester 



Winship, Boit& Co. 

Harvard Knitting 
Mills 

WAKEFIELD - MASSACHUSETTS 

MANTFACTTUKKS OF 

FAMOUS MEEODI-: UNDERWEAR 
"HARVARD MILLS" UNDERWICAR 



I 11 A-NII l'IMSIll:il ) 



Borst Pierce Co. 

Commission Merchants 
Boston 



(Jeorije II. Soiiifs lOilwin K. Fvlend 

Williniii Saville David A. Somes 



Saville, Somes 

& Co. 

Wholesale 
Grocers 

55 COMMERCIAL STREET 
BOSTON. MASS. 





IJOSTONI 



Class 

Photographers 

for Boston College 

1915-16-17-18 



164 Tremont Street 
Boston 



J. W. Brine Co. 

2S(i Oevoxsuire Stkekt, Boston 

AND 

Massachusetts Ave., C'a.mi!Bidge. Mass. 
The LeadiiiK Alliletic Outfitters 

q We i-'ivc .vciur urders our personal at- 
tention. This insures your re.ceivin.i.' 
exactl.v what .von order. Wc do nut 
siih-slitiitc. Q \Vi' alisiilntel.v jruarantee 
tliat our unifcn-uis are the I'.KST made. 
We ;.'ive more care anil attention to the 
maliing and linisliini; of our Kaseliall 
Inifornis than an.v other manufacturer 
— and we niaUe no exception to this 
statement. ^ Manat;ers of teams should 
write us for cluli pi'ices on all sporting' 

Hascl)all, F hall. Hockey, 

Haskell)all, ( Jyimiasiuiii Suits, 
l\o\vino Suits, Teuuis. 

O/Jiciiil Oiil/ilhrs It, ll,,sli,n Collr,/, 



3 rvuimom Lome** 

Clothes, Shoes and 
Furnishings 



Compliments of 

T.J.FlynnCo. 



Compliments of 

Matthew 
Sheehan Co. 



Compliments of 

E\'erett O. Fiske 
& Company 

Teachers' Agency 



Style is natui-ally lirst and fore- 
most in the tjioughts of High 
School and College Youug Men. 
Service is the quality which ap- 
peals most to parents. 
And the Academy line renders 
smaitness and wear at prices that 
uniiuestionahly ai-e, (juality con- 
sidered, the most moderate in 
Boston. 

"Academy" Suits and 
Overcoats 

$20, $25, $30 and up to $60 

Leopold Morse 

V^O. Boston, Mass. 

Wasliiiigtoii Street, corner Brattle 
Adams Square 



Open a Savings Account 

WITH THE 

Federal Trust Co. 

Water and Devonshire Streets, Boston 

JOSEPH H. O'XEIL, President 

42 Per Cent 

Special Attention Given to Deposits by Mail 

TOTAL EESOURCES - $12,000,000.00 

Deposits Go On Interest Monthly 



SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE 

CHARLES OF LONDON 



E. M. D'Arcy 

Interior 
Decorator 



1020-24 COLONIAL BUILDING 

100 BOYLSTON STREET 
Telephone - Beacli liSSO 



Cox Sons & Vining 

IIADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 




CAPS and GOWNS 

(■0)iti-(ict for Boston GoUci/e 

Correct Hoods for All Degrees. 

Cassocks, Choir and Judicial 

Robes. 

Best ilntrrkil find Workmanship 
(It Redsomihle Prices. 



EATERY object tliat bears our imprint 
is distinctive in design and work- 
mansliip. 
It is this toncli ot indiA'iduality in all 
our products, regardless of price, whicli 
instantly identifies them as works of 
art, insuring the enduring satisfaction 
that comes only through true merit 
and beautv. 

rA^W.J.Feeley 
Company 

Ecclr.siasfical Art Metal Work 

Kstiililislied 1S7U 

Xkw Youk Showuoo.ms, 10 PIvst ^Otii Street 
FMCt(ir,\' : rri)vi<l(MK-('. 1!. I. 



Bracelets 

Class Pins 

Locl-ets 

Medals 

Rinys 

Rosaries 

Altars 

I'lniih'Iahra 

Candhslicl,-! 



Crasses 

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Cnicifi.rcs 

Fonts 

Memorial 'I'ahlets 

Oil Stovl~s 

Ost< iisoria 

J'lil/iits 

l'!l.res 

ReVniaaries 

Sauitiiiirii l.iniijis 



7-20-4 

lOc ('i.;j;;ir 

Til JO DEXTEK 

T-ondres Shaped Oc Cigar 

K. (J. SI'LUVAN, Mtmiifactiner 

JIancliester, N. H. 

Larjrest Selliui; Brand 10c Cii-'ar lu 

the VCm-xa 



H.A.&M.L. Dolan 

Church 
Goods 

76 Summer St., Boston 



Teleplioiie Coiiiiectiou 



Charles Logue 
Building Co. 

18 TKKMOXT STREET 

Builders 

and General 

Contractors 



MASTER BriLDERS ASSOGIATIOX 

166 Devonshire Street 
Shop : Wareham Street, Boston 



Compliments of 

Riverbank 
Court 
Hotel 



Gillespie Method 

of 

Hygienic Treatment of 
Hair and Scalp 

n The Gillespie Method of Hygienic 
Treatment and Manipulation of the 
Head not only stops the hair from fall- 
ing out. but causes new hair to grow 
and also cures nervous headaches and 
is most beneficial to persons suffering 
from insomnia. II This Method has been 
accepted by the Waltham Training 
School for Nurses and is used in con- 
nection with their work. It is also 
endorsed by many leading physicians. 
tl Patients are assured of absolute quiet 
and cleanliness, fl The Gillespie School 
for the teaching of above method, also 
Shampooing, Manicuring and Facial 
Treatment is conducted for pupils, 
where individual and class instruction 
is given. Diploma given at satisfactory 
completion of course. 

MISS ,VN!VA OWENS 

ShnmpooiiiK' - Mnuiouriu;;;- 

30 HuiitillK-ton .Vve.. noNtoiu Mu«s. 

Back Buy 37»fS 



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